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I don't care for orchestral templates... Your view?

Do you like working with orchestral template?

  • Yes

    Votes: 123 69.5%
  • No

    Votes: 54 30.5%

  • Total voters
    177

samphony

Senior Member
For logic users who want to add entire sections of tracks including routing etc there are multiple approaches. One way would be to put certain tracks into summing track stacks and save these as patches. Another approach would be to create projects for all your food groups and import the sections you need through the Import Logic Pro Project option.

Also keep in mind that a barebones template for routing and grouping makes sense as well. Especially groups can’t be imported. So if you wanna use groups for showing/hiding tracks a basic template is necessary.
 

bradleybboone

New Member
Like @Guy Rowland and others, I’ve been working on an enable/disable template in VEPro as a rack instrument in Cubase. All Kontakt instruments are purged and disabled until required. The instruments are multi out in Kontakt (shorts & longs) and bused in VEPro to 2 stereo outs by library (again, shorts & longs). I have also used 2 stereo outputs per instrument directly to Cubase, but I don’t always need that granular access in Cubase when I can control inserts, sends, and levels in VEPro. The enable signal is sent via iPad Pro with Metagrid or Lemur (they also manage track visibility). See threads by @marcodistefano and @jononotbono on this board and YouTube for their enable & track visibility methodologies. Lastly, as my composition begins to exceed my system resources, I render tracks that don’t need further editing and disable those tracks in VEPro.
 

TomislavEP

Member
To template or not to template is a question I'm still not totally certain about ever since I've started with composition and music production.

Personally, I have to say I often cringe when I see those huge orchestral templates some people are using, not only containing every single instrument and / or articulation but also every single library they have. Not only they often seem daunting at first sight, they also demand quite a hardware resources.

I can understand the allure of such templates if you need to start working very quickly. Personally, I don't have such time restrains for now, so I'm striving toward having as little elements possible in my sessions, although I have quite a few of Kontakt libraries now.

As a REAPER user, I usually start with blank track template for Kontakt with multiple number of MIDI channels and outputs - 4, 8, and 16 - depending on my needs. I then use Kontakt favorites, snapshots and multis to organize and load the instruments I use on a daily basis. Though I like to have as little things as possible in my template, I prefer working with seperate articulations instead of keyswitches.
 
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Guy Rowland

Senior Member
I've put up a 3-part video on the Cubase / Disabled VE Pro thing. Part one is just a 5 minute intro to what it does, part two how its put together and part three why its worth the bother rather than other methods. Just linking part 1 here, the other parts are linked in the info.

 

arcy

Member
I like templates because make me feel like an orchestral director that can manage instantly all the players. I like to open my Logic session and have my personal orchestra ready to go. I just think to play music and not reinvent the wheel with settings, imports etc...
 

Wolfie2112

Senior Member
I've put up a 3-part video on the Cubase / Disabled VE Pro thing. Part one is just a 5 minute intro to what it does, part two how its put together and part three why its worth the bother rather than other methods. Just linking part 1 here, the other parts are linked in the info.

Great videos, thank you!
 

jononotbono

Luke Johnson
I've put up a 3-part video on the Cubase / Disabled VE Pro thing. Part one is just a 5 minute intro to what it does, part two how its put together and part three why its worth the bother rather than other methods. Just linking part 1 here, the other parts are linked in the info.

Thanks! Going to check this out later!
 
I like templates because make me feel like an orchestral director that can manage instantly all the players. I like to open my Logic session and have my personal orchestra ready to go. I just think to play music and not reinvent the wheel with settings, imports etc...
Arcy and I have the same reasons. I just hate duplication of effort. If I started every project with a blank template, I spend a huge amount of time re-loading go-to libraries (especially orchestral ones) that I use on every project. In my own personal workflow, this is a massive waste of time when I could otherwise have just saved a template with things that I always use. The orchestra itself is a kind of template that has such an infinite range of textures and styles, so why, as Arcy says, reinvent the wheel?

Having said that, I do create "RESERVED" tracks in all sections of my template to give myself flexibility to put in something new (perhaps an articulation) should I need it for that specific project.
 
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averystemmler

Active Member
I like anything on a slave in VEP to be part of my template, regardless of which DAW I'm working in. All that stuff is static anyways, and the tedium to get all the mic positions routed and grouped would prevent me from ever bothering to use the slaves at all.

I used to have literally every sample I own disabled in VEP instances. It was fun to scroll through the project and see everything, but it got ridiculous. Doing anything remotely disruptive to the structure of a project was a comedy of errors and it really ended up costing me more time than it saved.

So, now I've just taken to loading the bare minimum in a base template - the basic routing, stem configurations, and CSS/CSSS/CSB via a VEP slave - and developing per project templates from there as needed. Being able to save track templates helps immensely too.
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
The one and only reason I want a VEP slave is in order to leave a bunch of samples loaded pretty much 24/7 that I tend to use a lot, then I can quickly setup a new project in LogicPro without having to load any samples, nor wade through a huge starting template.

I don't think there is any right or wrong approach here, its great to hear everyone's experience and sometimes consider another approach. I personally tend to write differently enough every day that a single starting template would probably not work well for me. On the other hand, a basic VSL orch template is not a bad way to get started, I have not yet had the patience to sit down and really create a single ideal template. If I was a working pro that needed to crank out trailer music or something with a lot of the same sounds on a daily basis, I would probably make a template though. Or a few.
 
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