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HZ Strings First Look VIDEO - Full Live Stream (w/chatroom)

husselblum

New Member

reids

Member
You've led yourself to believe that. As many others have pointed out, based on the walkthroughs and demos, there was no marketing that hinted at or promised the sound of Zimmer from 20 years ago. That's been well covered by plenty of other libraries, SF included, for going on 10 years now. What you are getting access to, is, literally the samples he used less than a year ago on an Oscar nominated score. How much more bleeding edge can you expect...for $600 bucks? The price of a mexican strat.
And this is to the point I was trying to make. Quite frankly, there was so few demo videos put out by SF only briefly covering it, one has little to know idea what this product is other than to assume by the iconic name and the hype of 344 STRING PLAYERS, what direction and the kind of string library it is. Would you not think there would be no loud, bombastic, and thick strings covered with such a scale of string players recorded? Yes, I led myself to believe this to be the kind of sound one would get. Why is that? Because that is the kind of sound that has been widely known and associated to his name. I "led" myself to believe this based on the name and lack of coherent demo videos/music and Daniel believed this as well yet we don't know each other and probably live in different parts of the world. So I'm most certainly sure a vast majority of interested prospects will too until they get to the point of realization where we're in now. This is the issue here with the use of the name and not being upfront with what it actually is and can do. So bravo for being so vague where one has little to go on than believing in the name and the man's signature string sounds. It's a great idea for business cash-in at the moment, but not long term.
 

davidgary73

Active Member
Just posting this so we know what HZ Strings is all about from the man himself.

if you want action, you need tight, small sections, front desk, playing aggressively with agility. Like a squadron of Spitfires :). If you want a broad, epic, wide, girth and depth to your sound, use a large section. Lancasters over Berlin. It’s quit simple: you need to move massive volumes of air evenly. (Look up the physics paper on what the “Greatful Dead” did with their P.A. In the 70’s: hundreds of very high quality speakers as a wall, none of them driven into distortion...) That’s why Brass is so efficient at being loud and epic.
But I’ve moved on from a lot of those “Batman” days, even though it’s all part of an ongoing experiment and search for ‘The Sound’ I hear in my head. But that was 16(!) Years ago...
That “Batman” score is very much two complete string sections: one for the Long notes to give it size (never playing more than an mf+), and a more close-mic’ed agile section for the ostinatoes, accents and action bits. The ‘bite’ comes from the low Brass and Horns. ...by the time of, I think, “Dark Knight”, there was a gaggle of contra bass bassoons and bass clarinets hidden away with the Basses. But if you really have a good, analytical listen, you’ll always find two orchestras serving different roles (and different perspectives) in the action stuff. The excitement comes from the percussion, the synth and soloists. The emotional depth comes from the large amount of players playing at a quite restrained dynamic. I said it before: you need to find out where the Sweet Spot in an instrument is. And it’s never at the fff end of things. The rest is up to orchestration, recording and mixing chops. I didn’t come to being a composer from the normal channels of music school. I started out as a sound-designer (it was called “Synth-programmer” then) for other composers like Stanley Myers, Michael Kamen, George Martin, Christopher Gunning...So I developed a sense of production (especially with Trevor Horn) and Sonic Landscapes...
But if you want that “Pirates” sound (please don’t - it’s soooo old), you have to remember its 50% samples. The same goes for things like “Gladiator”, which we did 18 Years ago.
But we live in a time where you can truly experiment with sound like never before, especially with the scale of things. There is no reason to write like Beethoven and use that (then) revolutionary size orchestra any more. Our way of projecting the notes from the instrument on stage to the ear of the listener has changed tremendously since the time of Mahler (one of my favorite orchestrators...). All the “tricks” he had to pull, like, for example, the ‘offstage’ brass playing quite forcefully - and therefore ‘unnaturally’ against a single flute solo in the 2nd Symphony - we can do with recording and amplifying and specialization of the sound (Space! That’s what it’s all about for me... building perspectives that might be realistic or take poetic license...). I think it serves no one to try to emulate the “classical” orchestra (other than as an exercise). The old masters wherent old then, they where the revolutionary young things, and Strauss and Stravinsky had riots because they didn’t sound like what had come before. Equally, I don’t think louder or bigger is better. But... a solo violin has an unmistakably different timbre than a violin section. A single drummer has a different sound than turning them into a section as we did on “Man Of Steel”...
So no, this was never thought off as the ‘All-Purpose’ string library. Those all exist, in one form or other. What Paul, Christian and I are interested in is expanding the range of possibilities beyond the constraints of architecture and 16th century technology. This library can play loud. That’s easy with that many players (sidebar - twice as many players is not twice as loud), but to be able to find the hidden, the quiet nuance, the most beautiful shimmer in the air...that’s what I’m interested in - at the moment. Next year, or maybe even tomorrow, I’ll be hunting down some other sound...
So this is not an ‘All-Purpose’ string library. It’s an “immersive" string library, not a bombastic string library.
 
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ism

Senior Member
In hopes of maybe getting more discussion of music and less repetitive combativeness, heres a link to Han's post which is well worth a read ..

https://vi-control.net/community/threads/hans-zimmer-strings-demos-welcome-here.70175/page-5#post-4209530

A few hilights:

"if you want action, you need tight, small sections, front desk, playing aggressively with agility. Like a squadron of Spitfires"


"If you want a broad, epic, wide, girth and depth to your sound, use a large section. Lancasters over Berlin. It’s quit simple: you need to move massive volumes of air evenly. (Look up the physics paper on what the “Greatful Dead” did with their P.A. In the 70’s: hundreds of very high quality speakers as a wall, none of them driven into distortion...)"

"The emotional depth comes from the large amount of players playing at a quite restrained dynamic. I said it before: you need to find out where the Sweet Spot in an instrument is. And it’s never at the fff end of things. The rest is up to orchestration, recording and mixing chops."

"So no, this was never thought off as the ‘All-Purpose’ string library. Those all exist, in one form or other. What Paul, Christian and I are interested in is expanding the range of possibilities beyond the constraints of architecture and 16th century technology. This library can play loud. That’s easy with that many players (sidebar - twice as many players is not twice as loud), but to be able to find the hidden, the quiet nuance, the most beautiful shimmer in the air...that’s what I’m interested in - at the moment. Next year, or maybe even tomorrow, I’ll be hunting down some other sound..."

And this I think goes a long way to answering this question:

Pray-tell how is this library such a revolution in your eyes?
And just hearing this samples, the demos, this is something I can feel about this library, if not necessarily articulate. And I think Hans articulates it brilliantly, here and elsewhere.

And the reason I would even read so far in such a combative thread is in hopes of getting some insight into this.

I do like Daniels's music and style. When I tuned into the livecast I was hoping to get some insight into how this 'revolutionary' (which I think here just means new-to-sample libraries) quality might complement his work, and was disappointed.

But maybe now we can frame this in terms of the legitimate tensions of two styles and productively discuss this at a musical level?

I'm not saying I'm against a good riot per se, but the internet isn't my favourite medium for riots.
 
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bpford

New Member
And this is to the point I was trying to make. Quite frankly, there was so few demo videos put out by SF only briefly covering it, one has little to know idea what this product is other than to assume by the iconic name and the hype of 344 STRING PLAYERS, what direction and the kind of string library it is. Would you not think there would be no loud, bombastic, and thick strings covered with such a scale of string players recorded? Yes, I led myself to believe this to be the kind of sound one would get. Why is that? Because that is the kind of sound that has been widely known and associated to his name. I "led" myself to believe this based on the name and lack of coherent demo videos/music and Daniel believed this as well yet we don't know each other and probably live in different parts of the world. So I'm most certainly sure a vast majority of interested prospects will too until they get to the point of realization where we're in now. This is the issue here with the use of the name and not being upfront with what it actually is and can do. So bravo for being so vague where one has little to go on than believing in the name and the man's signature string sounds. It's a great idea for business cash-in at the moment, but not long term.
I think they had the same amount of demos they usually put out for a product...between 3 and 4? And I listened to them and thought...I don't need this...it's too big and epic for the music I make.

As to what I expect 344 STRING PLAYERS to sound like...I would never expect them to be playing super articulate, defined shorts or whatever. Have you heard a large ensemble playing tutti before in a room? It's pretty loose, even when it's tight.

If the SF marketing videos had been in the vein of the EW choir marketing material, I'd think you guys would have a point, but they led with a typically restrained and tasteful, if heavily publicized roll-out.

Anyway, there was a demo someone posted on the other thread that was pretty good and way more typical of what I expect of the Zimmer sound, than the piece DJ was trying to shoehorn the library into. So I do think it can capture that ostinato epic sound, its just not what you've imagined it to be.
 
OP
Daniel James

Daniel James

Senior Member
"if you want action, you need tight, small sections, front desk, playing aggressively with agility. Like a squadron of Spitfires"


"If you want a broad, epic, wide, girth and depth to your sound, use a large section. Lancasters over Berlin. It’s quit simple: you need to move massive volumes of air evenly. (Look up the physics paper on what the “Greatful Dead” did with their P.A. In the 70’s: hundreds of very high quality speakers as a wall, none of them driven into distortion...)"

"The emotional depth comes from the large amount of players playing at a quite restrained dynamic. I said it before: you need to find out where the Sweet Spot in an instrument is. And it’s never at the fff end of things. The rest is up to orchestration, recording and mixing chops."

"So no, this was never thought off as the ‘All-Purpose’ string library. Those all exist, in one form or other. What Paul, Christian and I are interested in is expanding the range of possibilities beyond the constraints of architecture and 16th century technology. This library can play loud. That’s easy with that many players (sidebar - twice as many players is not twice as loud), but to be able to find the hidden, the quiet nuance, the most beautiful shimmer in the air...that’s what I’m interested in - at the moment. Next year, or maybe even tomorrow, I’ll be hunting down some other sound..."
Then give me all that. Give me all the articulations and prebaked versions of those. Give me the small tight section in divisi. Give me the 32 basses he talked about in his roundtable. Take all those staples one associates (including the smaller and softer stuff alongside) with the brand of Hans Zimmer and put THAT in the library called Hans Zimmer Strings.

Thats why I keep saying you have to take Hans the person out of this a little bit. He personally sees things like the batman ostinato, or the pirates theme or the gladiator battle.... and he sees it as being done/old/boring because he has exhausted those techniques. But I HAVN'T there are things with those techniques which I want to take in new directions, ones Hans hasn't thought of yet. I want to try things he didn't before he moved on. Techniques and stylistic choices which are out of the ordinary are things I want to experiment with. Thats why I wanted this library to be a collection of what defines the Zimmer legacy. But I just got another string library with Hans' name on. Hans is still experimenting with this current thing, I want to see what he does with it before I try so that I can try to do things he didn't think to do.

Lol anyways I am too out of it to argue with everyone today, I shall continue this when I am next able.

-DJ
 

jtnyc

Senior Member
Spitfire has consistently shown a strong commitment to its customers. The inconsistencies of volume, issues with legato, etc. will get sorted out (hopefully, quickly).
Many old Spitfire Libraries still have the inconsistencies you mention and more including tuning, phasing issues, and missing mic positions. They have shown more of a strong commitment to releasing libraries at a rapid rate, promoting the hell out of them with glossy stylized marketing campaigns, all the while not addressing issues in previously released libraries. When I think of the time and resources that goes into all that marketing, while at the same time existing libraries sit for months and months with unresolved issues... sorry I just don't see that commitment. Again, I love many Spitfire libraries and recognize the talent and time that goes into conceptualizing, planning and making them, but to say that they are on top of fixing issues just doesn't ring true to me.

I just grabbed Tundra during the sale. Some really beautiful sounds in there! I absolutely love the soft lush vibe it provides. Unfortunately there are missing mic positions, unintended notes in samples, bumpy buzzy releases in places and tuning issues. How completely disappointing. The library was released in the fall of 2016, yet these issues still exist? How many new releases since then? I have to say that if I dropped $449 on it, I'd be more upset than I am. I'm still not happy, but there is a lot to like and at $199 it's easier to swallow.

I say, less marketing, slow down the pace of new releases and focus on quality control and fixes.
 

reids

Member
Then give me all that. Give me all the articulations and prebaked versions of those. Give me the small tight section in divisi. Give me the 32 basses he talked about in his roundtable. Take all those staples one associates (including the smaller and softer stuff alongside) with the brand of Hans Zimmer and put THAT in the library called Hans Zimmer Strings.

Thats why I keep saying you have to take Hans the person out of this a little bit. He personally sees things like the batman ostinato, or the pirates theme or the gladiator battle.... and he sees it as being done/old/boring because he has exhausted those techniques. But I HAVN'T there are things with those techniques which I want to take in new directions, ones Hans hasn't thought of yet. I want to try things he didn't before he moved on. Techniques and stylistic choices which are out of the ordinary are things I want to experiment with. Thats why I wanted this library to be a collection of what defines the Zimmer legacy. But I just got another string library with Hans' name on. Hans is still experimenting with this current thing, I want to see what he does with it before I try so that I can try to do things he didn't think to do.

Lol anyways I am too out of it to argue with everyone today, I shall continue this when I am next able.

-DJ
These are exactly my points here as well. But you have to understand you are not going to get these signature sounds and playing styles from SF. Not this early in the game. It's like pharmacy, you want a cure or solution but they just give you a fix so you come back hoping or "believing" for something more your never gonna get. Once they've exhausted giving you bits and pieces here and there for strings, milking you, then maybe...just maybe it may be time to take a serious look at making the compendium HZ Strings Library after their 30th string library many years later. Probably by this time, technology will have advanced so much already that other devs will all have this area covered well.
 

davidgary73

Active Member
I think we should save ourselves from this agony ahaha. This string library is not epic or bombastic and no longer the old HZ style we are so accustomed to. It’s HZ Dunkirk style from now onwards, wide and immersive. No more big drums and crazy fast string lines.
 
OP
Daniel James

Daniel James

Senior Member
These are exactly my points here as well. But you have to understand you are not going to get these signature sounds and playing styles from SF. Not this early in the game. It's like pharmacy, you want a cure or solution but they just give you a fix so you come back hoping or "believing" for something more your never gonna get. Once they've exhausted giving you bits and pieces here and there for strings, milking you, then maybe...just maybe it may be time to take a serious look at making the compendium HZ Strings Library after their 30th string library many years later. Probably by this time, technology will have advanced so much already that other devs will all have this area covered well.
Yeah I just wanted the thing about Hans Zimmer strings to be things that are about it being Hans Zimmer. I had people emailing me saying that Ashton made it sound like Hans Zimmer....I have no fucking doubt he did. He made all the libraries before HZ Strings sound like Hans Zimmer too. You can take pretty much any library from the past 10 years and make it sound like Hans Zimmer. I just wanted the Hans Zimmer Strings library to get me there from the get go. Have some Zimmer style patches prebaked, have some special zimmer style articulations, groupings layering etc.

I'm not saying you can't get a Zimmer sound out of Hans Zimmer strings...I'm saying its no more Zimmer sounding than any other string library, and thats what I wanted, I wanted to push a key and be thrown into the purgetory of inception trying to find jack sparrow while toppling an emperor. And this is just another string library with more players with Zimmer branding.

Sure its my own fault for assuming brand Zimmer meant something in particular. A mistake I won't make again (I said that after HZ perc urgh) as I now know Hans Zimmer on the brand just means he is helping make it not it will sound anything like brand Hans Zimmer. But then I would just be comparing it to any other string library on the market. And I already said in the video how I would rate this library as just another string library (which I guess it actually is)....its inconsistent with articulations, The basic articulations do not have enough depth (programming/layer wise) compared to the competition. There are other string libraries that to me surpass what its trying to do as a string library in terms of bread and butter uses like legatos or spiccatos or tremolos.

And thats my point. If the brand Hans Zimmer has no specific meaning then this library is just another string library but they have more players and mics. Which is a nice novelty but in terms of end result makes it a very niche library. For the same price you can buy libraries which are actually closer to what one would expect to hear from something with the Zimmer brand, except they also include brass perc choir and band.

If this didn't have the Zimmer branding, and Spitfire made the exact same library I would have shown an interest for sure but for the same reason I don't have their other strings (not my taste and dont feel powerful enough) I probably would have passed. I for one definitely bought into the fact it was a Hans Zimmer String library. Again sure maybe its just me, but I wanted something special. Something defining. Instead its Spitfire Strings - With Hans Orchestra.

-DJ
 

reids

Member
Also, can we hear some strings runs on here if someone can share or if this has already been covered somewhere. Thanks.
 

Soundhound

Senior Member
Having spent much of my adult life in marketing meetings (time i will never get back) exactly that kind of hilarious/mind numbingly ridiculous outcomes are pretty par for the course i’m afraid.


But they have a whole marketing team, it surprises me that they missed that putting Hans Zimmer on their products would make their customers expect a Hans Zimmer sound.

-DJ
 

Puzzlefactory

Senior Member
Surely sounding like HZ, isn’t just about the sounds themselves but also about the composition too...?

Like in Christians video, where he used different patches playing different melodies that interacted with each other...
 

Rctec

Senior Member
Yeah I just wanted the thing about Hans Zimmer strings to be things that are about it being Hans Zimmer. I had people emailing me saying that Ashton made it sound like Hans Zimmer....I have no fucking doubt he did. He made all the libraries before HZ Strings sound like Hans Zimmer too. You can take pretty much any library from the past 10 years and make it sound like Hans Zimmer. I just wanted the Hans Zimmer Strings library to get me there from the get go. Have some Zimmer style patches prebaked, have some special zimmer style articulations, groupings layering etc.

I'm not saying you can't get a Zimmer sound out of Hans Zimmer strings...I'm saying its no more Zimmer sounding than any other string library, and thats what I wanted, I wanted to push a key and be thrown into the purgetory of inception trying to find jack sparrow while toppling an emperor. And this is just another string library with more players with Zimmer branding.

Sure its my own fault for assuming brand Zimmer meant something in particular. A mistake I won't make again (I said that after HZ perc urgh) as I now know Hans Zimmer on the brand just means he is helping make it not it will sound anything like brand Hans Zimmer. But then I would just be comparing it to any other string library on the market. And I already said in the video how I would rate this library as just another string library (which I guess it actually is)....its inconsistent with articulations, The basic articulations do not have enough depth (programming/layer wise) compared to the competition. There are other string libraries that to me surpass what its trying to do as a string library in terms of bread and butter uses like legatos or spiccatos or tremolos.

And thats my point. If the brand Hans Zimmer has no specific meaning then this library is just another string library but they have more players and mics. Which is a nice novelty but in terms of end result makes it a very niche library. For the same price you can buy libraries which are actually closer to what one would expect to hear from something with the Zimmer brand, except they also include brass perc choir and band.

If this didn't have the Zimmer branding, and Spitfire made the exact same library I would have shown an interest for sure but for the same reason I don't have their other strings (not my taste and dont feel powerful enough) I probably would have passed. I for one definitely bought into the fact it was a Hans Zimmer String library. Again sure maybe its just me, but I wanted something special. Something defining. Instead its Spitfire Strings - With Hans Orchestra.

-DJ
Daniel, I still haven’t watched your video, I apologize, but - why don’t I let you run riot for a couple of days in my room with my custom library? You can review it, if you want... the problem is, it’s so customized that, unless you spend a lot of time learning it - which you can’t do in a quick walk-through - it’ll sound... well, like anything “Spitfire” have done before (give or take some nuance that, by building their own sampler, they can address in time). I mean, you’ve had time in the past to see my set-up...
But you and I have very different ways of working. You are really fast - something I quite envy - and I have a feeling that you’d go absolutely balmy with the way my personal style of programming - and therefore the approach we’ve taken to the samples - takes forever. No instant gratification. I’m sooo slow, shaping each and every note. Because i can. Because that’s my style. And my samples are recorded and built around that. It’s not a ‘democratic’ sample engine like Kontakt that would suit everyone. It’s full of weird things that are specific to my ideas - and therefore my style.

But it is uncompromising.

And the team has accumulated vast amounts of knowledge over the years. The people like Mark Wherry and Claudius Brüse, Geoff Foster and our in-house sample team led by Taurees Habib and Raul Vega are forever focused on one dictator’s :) vision. I don’t have to worry about how anyone else feels about the technology.
I find it amazing that some people complain about the amount of microphones we give them. It just makes me wonder if they have any concept of how much the choice of microphones, the distance - and all the other things that shape a sound emotionally - are part of creating the whole experience of recorded music.

Of course you can come up with a thousand new ideas differing from mine with the same material my custom samples allow. Lorne Balfe or James Newton-Howard - to name just two - do so on a daily basis. But they’ve been part of this, learned how to use the damn thing and make it their own for years.

And, quite honestly, other than the bugs I know that the “Spitfire” team will fix (I knew it was a really dangerous project to do this library and build a new sample engine. But I didn’t want to discourage the “Spitfire” team. So I kept my mouth shut...), the sounds are build in the same principals I used for my own work:

Make a library that will take a while to explore. A long while...See it as a new instrument that you have to commit to learning - even if it’s just learning how differently the response and latency is.
Is the basic sound inspiring? Because if it is, it’s worth committing to learning. Instant sounds bore me. Will the sound draw you in or push you away? ...And that’s completely subjective.

Daniel, we would have called it the “Hans Zimmer Legacy” strings, had we gone for what I was doing in 1994...

There are enough libraries out there that can do a pretty close job of what I was doing then. I promise you - because I’ve done it, when I didn’t have access to my own sounds (it’s a long story) - I can make “Time” sound as good with just the normal “Spitfire” strings.

But this is different. On purpose.

Look, other sample libraries have tried to do “me”. Either by using the musicians I’m closely connected to, or hiring my sample team away from me. The knowledge and their worth came from working on my projects for years - but (and I think it was a short-lived Love affair) it didn’t seem to work out. I didn’t try to persuade my team to stay, I really hoped that this would work out for all of them and make their lifes better...And I didn’t tweet about it, either.

But if I had to give you a bottom line to this whole discussion, it’s this: I have nothing but faith and respect for the work that Christian, Paul and everyone else at “Spitfire” is doing. I value them as people and composers, as pushers-of-the-envelope. I think they have integrity and good taste. They share their knowledge (look at Christian’s videos - he doesn’t have to do that...), which goes far and above the call of duty in selling a product. They are passionate about music and the orchestra. ...and they happen to have a similar sonic Love for that studio that I do. And really, I’m not in it for the money. Never was.
-Hz-
 
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BradHoyt

Member
Then give me all that. Give me all the articulations and prebaked versions of those. Give me the small tight section in divisi. Give me the 32 basses he talked about in his roundtable. Take all those staples one associates (including the smaller and softer stuff alongside) with the brand of Hans Zimmer and put THAT in the library called Hans Zimmer Strings.

Thats why I keep saying you have to take Hans the person out of this a little bit. He personally sees things like the batman ostinato, or the pirates theme or the gladiator battle.... and he sees it as being done/old/boring because he has exhausted those techniques. But I HAVN'T there are things with those techniques which I want to take in new directions, ones Hans hasn't thought of yet. I want to try things he didn't before he moved on. Techniques and stylistic choices which are out of the ordinary are things I want to experiment with. Thats why I wanted this library to be a collection of what defines the Zimmer legacy. But I just got another string library with Hans' name on. Hans is still experimenting with this current thing, I want to see what he does with it before I try so that I can try to do things he didn't think to do.

Lol anyways I am too out of it to argue with everyone today, I shall continue this when I am next able.

-DJ
So Hans said this: "So no, this was never thought off as the ‘All-Purpose’ string library. Those all exist, in one form or other. What Paul, Christian and I are interested in is expanding the range of possibilities beyond the constraints of architecture and 16th century technology. This library can play loud. That’s easy with that many players (sidebar - twice as many players is not twice as loud), but to be able to find the hidden, the quiet nuance, the most beautiful shimmer in the air...that’s what I’m interested in - at the moment. Next year, or maybe even tomorrow, I’ll be hunting down some other sound..."

So what I take away from this is that Hans doesn't concern himself with what your, or anyone's, expectations of what a 'Hans Zimmer library' should be. You're not owed anything, he's doing whatever the hell he wants and Spitfire's helping him out with that.

I can respect that...
 
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Puzzlefactory

Senior Member
The whole “sound like Hans” discussion reminds me a lot of Noisia in the DnB scene 10 years ago.

Everyone in the forums wanted to sound like Noisia (in particular their signature “Reese” sound) and there were posts left right and centre asking “how do I make bass sound x or y...”

It was discovered that they mainly used FM8, Massive, Razer, Kontakt, mutliband distortions.

So naturally everyone went out and bought those plugins but still no one could get that Noisia sound.

It’s becaue it wasn’t plugins or even then production techniques they employed. It was the time they invested.

In a later interview it was discovered that they would dedicate days to sound designing a single sound. By creating dozens, if not hundreds of different iterations of the same sound and bouncing them down and saving them as they went and then finding the sound that suited the track later on.

Seems this is a similar situation.

It’s not about the starting sound set, but the time and effort that’s put into working with the sounds.
 
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M

mac

Guest
The whole “sound like Hans” discussion reminds me a lot of Noisia in the DnB scene 10 years ago.

Everyone in the forums wanted to sound like Noisia (in particular their signature “Reese” sound) and there were posts left right and centre asking “how do I make bass sound x or y...”

It was discovered that they mainly used FM8, Massive, Razer, Kontakt, mutliband distortions.

So naturally everyone went out and bought those plugins but still no one could get that Noisia sound.

It’s becaue it wasn’t plugins or even then production techniques they employed. It was the time they invested.

In a later interview it was discovered that they would dedicate days to sound designing a single sound. By creating dozens, if not hundreds of different iterations of the same sound and binding down and saving them as they went and then finding the sound that suited the track later on.

Seems this is a similar situation.

It’s not about the starting sound set, but the time and effort that’s put into working with the sounds.
But if someone were to release a synth called 'Noisia bass', I know my expectations wouldn't be for a standard synth with basic sine wave presets that you still had to program to get that sound!
 

Puzzlefactory

Senior Member
But if someone were to release a synth called 'Noisia bass', I know my expectations wouldn't be for a standard synth with basic sine wave presets that you still had to program to get that sound!
Actually, they did release a sound pack for Sylinth 1. It wasn’t very good (at least it didn’t have their signature sound in it).

Also, I don’t think it’s a fair comapatison to compare Hz strings to a synth with a couple of sine wave patches.
 
M

mac

Guest
Actually, they did release a sound pack for Sylinth 1. It wasn’t very good (at least it didn’t have their signature sound in it).
And this is Daniels point - he feels HZS doesn't have what he and a lot of people consider Hans signature sound.
 
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