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How to download or record audio from Youtube?

Tatiana Gordeeva

Active Member
I'm actually very surprised how there's been no grumbling about piracy yet. Interesting.
Even more funny is that no one even dared to reply to your post, so far!


DISCLAIMER: the following has nothing to do with this specific thread or people here. Just my little personal (a)musings (like the title of this forum implies) brought up to the surface by the ongoing discussion.

Since I recently started my very modest YouTube channel I already noticed a few things, things that I already held facts as music/audio is concerned.

Rules don't seem to apply to video the same way that we expect them to be applied to our music/audio which boils down to the same adage as usual: Do as I say, not as I do. People (myself included sometimes) usually hold other people to higher (moral) standards than they hold themselves to, therefore we expect people to follow rules that were not ready to follow ourselves.

We also tend to compartmentalize our moral rules. Even the RIAA does! They write:

Common examples of online copyright infringement:
  • You download an app on your smartphone that allows you to ‘strip’ the audio from any YouTube music video and permanently keep that audio in your music collection.
No mention of the video creator's rights :confused:

Everybody knows how Orwell's pig-in-charge once wrote on the doors of the barn:

All animals are equal... but some are more equal than others.

Well, the World is full of little piglets and creators must learn to live with it!

--- You have reached the end of this rant. ---

P.S. If you wonder... Even my cricket sounds were downloaded legally ;)
 
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JohnG

JohnG

Senior Member
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Interesting points about copyright. Ironically, the youtube videos themselves almost certainly are violating copyright. I doubt there's any way to obtain permission to post the recordings.

Maybe one could make a fair use argument that making a duplicate doesn't affect anyone's economics -- you are not preventing a commercial sale -- given that these recordings are, practically speaking, "stranded." The company that bought them appears to have gone out of business, and they don't show up for sale in any searches.

Would love to buy them new, as I indicated in my first post. I remember them from childhood and maybe kids today would still enjoy them.

I think though that I won't make copies after all, just because. Nevertheless, thanks everyone for the suggestions.
 

Tatiana Gordeeva

Active Member
Interesting points about copyright. Ironically, the youtube videos themselves almost certainly are violating copyright. I doubt there's any way to obtain permission to post the recordings.

Maybe one could make a fair use argument that making a duplicate doesn't affect anyone's economics -- you are not preventing a commercial sale -- given that these recordings are, practically speaking, "stranded."
I absolute l agree with you John. To reiterate: my comments above were triggered by, and not directed at, the present thread and people in it. Actually one user rightfully mentioned Internet Archive as a potential source for your videos. They are themselves (in the name of libraries everywhere) in the middle of a battle with publishers, for all readers' right to access books legally electronically.

These questions are especially crucial for all creators of videos, books... and music :) and have probably been debated since the invention of wax cylinder recordings. Or maybe cave people argued about who painted buffalos first, the girl in Lascaux or the guy in the Chauvet-Pont d'Arc cave :)
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Interesting points about copyright. Ironically, the youtube videos themselves almost certainly are violating copyright. I doubt there's any way to obtain permission to post the recordings.

Maybe one could make a fair use argument that making a duplicate doesn't affect anyone's economics -- you are not preventing a commercial sale -- given that these recordings are, practically speaking, "stranded." The company that bought them appears to have gone out of business, and they don't show up for sale in any searches.

Would love to buy them new, as I indicated in my first post. I remember them from childhood and maybe kids today would still enjoy them.

I think though that I won't make copies after all, just because. Nevertheless, thanks everyone for the suggestions.
I would say ethically there is a big difference between pirating/ripping done to avoid paying for something otherwise available commercially and pirating/ripping for archival or usage purposes of things you own or to obtain something that is not otherwise commercially available. Unpublished film scores are a thing that many here have obtained that often falls in the latter category too. It’s really hard to see how the media music business works as efficiently as it does without this not quite legal circulation of unpublished scores.

The Librarian of Congress regularly reauthorizes the breaking of digital locks and other copying of difficult to obtain materials for teaching and research within narrow bounds of the academy. Nevertheless it is almost impossible to do a public critical video essay on a movie, tv series, game or piece of music that is not open to take down or having the audio stripped or replaced. They aren’t always taken down, which makes the rules seem even more capricious.
 

Monkey Man

Charitable Hack
The music uploaded to SoundCloud, at least everything I've seen, is free to listen to.

Peeps who upload their stuff to it are fully-aware of this, hence, I see no issue in downloading said material.

I say this because the paid app I mentioned previously handles SoundCloud as well as YouTube and I said as much.
 

jononotbono

Luke Johnson
4k Downloader is so easy. I mean it’s shockingly easy I have no idea how it’s legal. You just copy the web address and caninstantly download a YouTube video and the audio (or either audio or video of both)

Or you could record audio using Audio Hijack. That thing is one of the reasons to own a Mac!
 

Polkasound

Senior Member
[I speak not as an expert but just as someone who has had to look into this in the past.]

When someone submits their copyrighted music to YouTube or SoundCloud, they are authorizing those distributors to stream their music. Unless the copyright holder specifically allows the music to also be made downloadable on those services, it is forbidden for anyone to record the music while it is streaming.

Services like YouTube pay a royalty to the copyright holder when their music is streamed. If you record the music as it streams and then play the copy you've recorded, you will: 1) Violate the terms of the streaming service 2) Violate the copyright by making an unauthorized copy of the music 3) Deny the copyright holder their due royalties.

From YouTube:

The following restrictions apply to your use of the Service. You are not allowed to:
  1. access, reproduce, download, distribute, transmit, broadcast, display, sell, license, alter, modify or otherwise use any part of the Service or any Content except: (a) as expressly authorized by the Service; or (b) with prior written permission from YouTube and, if applicable, the respective rights holders;
  2. circumvent, disable, fraudulently engage with, or otherwise interfere with any part of the Service (or attempt to do any of these things), including security-related features or features that (a) prevent or restrict the copying or other use of Content or (b) limit the use of the Service or Content;
The reason I'm posting this is because there are all kinds of YouTube ripping apps out there, and that inadvertently gives people the impression that ripping music from YouTube must be OK.

Buzz Killington
 

Tatiana Gordeeva

Active Member
The reason I'm posting this is because there are all kinds of YouTube ripping apps out there, and that inadvertently gives people the impression that ripping music from YouTube must be OK.
Absolutely true. And as I wrote before:
People tend to compartmentalize their moral rules. ;)
 

Polkasound

Senior Member
I'm allowed to rip my own videos though yeah?
If you own the rights to both the song and the recording of it, then you are an authorized distributor of both and can do what you want. But if you only own rights to one or the other, then you have to abide by the restrictions of how the other right was licensed for use.

Two examples:

If you wrote a song and a band recorded a cover of it and uploaded it to YouTube, you can't rip it from YouTube because you don't own any distribution rights to their recording of your song.

If you recorded a cover of someone else's song, licensed it only for streaming, and uploaded it to YouTube, you're not authorized to rip the song from YouTube because you did not license your cover for downloads, which pays the copyright holder of the song a higher mechanical royalty than streaming. But from a practical standpoint, it's fine because you already possess the music that was uploaded, so the song is not actually being redistributed.

[EDIT: I should clarify that my examples apply to uploaded music. I am not involved at all with video sync licensing, so my advice may not apply across the board to all scenarios.]
 

Rory

Amateur Auteur
Audio Hijack is much better. But yeah, it’s not free.
@JohnG uses MacOS. This is just a matter of recording your computer system's audio. A recent free app called BlackHole handles this very well, and has effectively replaced the now obsolete Soundflower. This is a link to BlackHole: https://existential.audio/blackhole/ This is the BlackHole GitHub page: https://github.com/ExistentialAudio/BlackHole
For the task he describes, Audio Hijack is not "better". BlackHole will do what he wants just as well, and it costs nothing.
 

d.healey

Senior Member
For the task he describes, Audio Hijack is not "better". BlackHole will do what he wants just as well, and it costs nothing.
Both are pretty poor solutions. They require you to play the whole thing and sit there ready to press start/stop to manage the process.

youtube-dl (and some of the other solutions mentioned) will download an entire playlist with a single command without any manual intervention required, and they don't require you to play each video start to end.
 
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