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How often do you make use of the same choir library?

Voider

Came from the future
I am currently thinking about purchasing Rhodope 2 from Strezov-Sampling, but I am not sure how often I would use it. I mean, using the same choir over and over again in the tracks might become tiring - maybe that's a different thing if you got several different sounding choirs and can switch between them?

Is something like a choir more for a specific need, like if you work on a soundtrack that requires it on a few tracks, or do you think it's something that you can use as often as other instruments?

Personally I am completely into cyberpunk/sci-fi music, so I could actually mangle the audio or post process it and get some more usage out of it, but I then think again, I could do that trick maybe 2-3 times and then it starts to become repetetive to use it in another track.

So I'd love to hear how often you use the same choir library in your tracks and/or how you keep it fresh if you do it more often. :)
 

hawpri

Active Member
I don't see it anymore an issue than using the same brass or string library.
I would agree except for possibly the case of exposed lines where you may layer a soloist for a more unique timbre or to make it feel more fresh. Also you could mix and match sections of choirs from different libraries on top of just adding a soloist. Come to think of it, that does in fact happen to be what I do with brass libraries. For whatever reason I hadn't really thought of it that way until now.
 

Wally Garten

Active Member
It really depends on the library. Some libraries, like Oceania and Storm Choir (1), only have one sound, which they nail consistently, but which would get a little repetitive if you used them on every track. (Those libraries are also pretty cheap, especially on sale, so no knock on them.) But many choir libraries have lots of different options. So, for example, the three Soundiron choirs (Mars, Venus, and Mercury) all feature oohs and ahhs (which can be mixed in different ways), words and wordicles, whispers, textures, some limited but useful soloist sounds, etc. Same is true of Wotan/Freyja/Arva, Voxos, etc. If you use them in different ways on different tracks, they'll sound different and add different things.

Also, I think you can really keep things fresh by having multiple lines and using a choir in combination with some high-quality dedicated solo libraries -- Organic Samples, Eduardo Tarilonte, Realivox. If you use a choir just as a block, yeah, it might start to sound the same after a while. But if you write different lines for the different parts, plus a soloist or two, and open up the space that way, it will feel a lot more varied.
 

JonSolo

Not Han's Brother
This is a really good question. With so many choices, we are in a most unique situation, one that musicians or composers or even producers have not found ourselves in before. A long time ago, we had a few tools and used them to death without ever considering how repetitive the "sound" might be.

But to answer your question, there are several methods I employ to keep a single library (in this case a choir library) fresh. You talked about Rhodope...and that is a great example of a highly flexible library. I have used it in situations as pads, leads, choirs, and even percussive elements. While not unconventional, it still feels fresh.

Here is an example. I used Rhodope to "musically" simulate a train starting to move. It is not used as a sound effect, but neither is it used in a traditional sense. (the choir comes in around 1:20)


I tried to find a track I had made that may lend itself closer to your preferred genre.

Of course, I also use this choir in the traditional sense and get great results. Obviously the music around it, the lead you choose, and the variety of style, chords, and patterns all add to the diversity the listener hears.
 
OP
Voider

Voider

Came from the future
I tried to find a track I had made that may lend itself closer to your preferred genre.
Yeah that was really pleasing! I love that sound, reminds me so much of Ghost in the shell - Making of cyborg, where I've heard a bulgarian choir for the first time ever. It just sounds so beautiful.

Of course, I also use this choir in the traditional sense and get great results. Obviously the music around it, the lead you choose, and the variety of style, chords, and patterns all add to the diversity the listener hears.
Can you add another example with a traditional use of it? Would like to hear that too :)

If you use a choir just as a block, yeah, it might start to sound the same after a while. But if you write different lines for the different parts, plus a soloist or two, and open up the space that way, it will feel a lot more varied.
That's a good point!
 

JonSolo

Not Han's Brother
Sure. This is a sample from an incomplete project (there is more but less finished) but will give you an idea...again about halfway through.

 
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