How is this done in Logic?

BassClef

Senior Member
I've never used Cubase, but it looks like you are working just with velocity on the piano notes. When your crescendo is executed, it keeps the relative velocity of each chord arpeggio.

I Logic, I can do a simple chreshendo with velocity, but it makes a straight line and negates the individual velocity differences within each of your chord arpeggios. So in Logic, I would have to use cc automation like cc1 or cc11 depending on what your instruments response to.

If there is a way to do what you did in Cubase, I'd like to know.
 
Yes. But while you can control the end of the Region like that, you can't control the start of the Region. So, if you want to bring down the first notes completely to then gradually increase until they reach their normal velocity, there's no way of doing that in this window with, say, a reverse line from top right to bottom left as an elegant and intuitive method. You'd need to go into MIDI Transform and use Relative Crescendo for that.
 

Living Fossil

Senior Member
So, if you want to bring down the first notes completely to then gradually increase until they reach their normal velocity, there's no way of doing that in this window with, say, a reverse line from top right to bottom left as an elegant and intuitive method. You'd need to go into MIDI Transform and use Relative Crescendo for that.
In these cases i combine scaling lines with adding/subtracting velocities directly in the piano roll.
So in one step i care about the relative range, and in the second about the absolute values.
E.g. if i want the first part going from velocity 01 up to 30 and the scaling gives me 64 up to 94, i grab the notes and reduce the velocity with the mouse.

Another case where you need an extra step is where the actual velocities hinder Logic to get the desired range. Usually i reduce first, then make the curve and adjust finally.

The procedure doesn't sound elegant, but it's lightening fast once the movement is in your muscle memory.
 

BassClef

Senior Member
Yes. But while you can control the end of the Region like that, you can't control the start of the Region. So, if you want to bring down the first notes completely to then gradually increase until they reach their normal velocity, there's no way of doing that in this window with, say, a reverse line from top right to bottom left as an elegant and intuitive method. You'd need to go into MIDI Transform and use Relative Crescendo for that.
Yes you can. Simply reduce All velocities equally until those on the left are at a level you want to begin your crescendo, then execute the crescendo line as acted above.
 
Yeah, guys, I know how to get it done. I was just pointing out that the feature of the line in combination with the command key is unfinished, as it does provide a one-stop-shop for processing the end of the selection, but does not for the start of the selection, when it actually could, with an intuitive gesture (line from right to left). So what is a one-step procedure for one range suddenly and unnecessarily becomes a two-step procedure for another range. If that is intentional, it is bad software design. But I assume they just had to leave it in that unfinished state and move on.
 
OP
stigc56

stigc56

Senior Member
Okay.
Thanks a lot for your replies.
Hope a future update of LPX will include all these detailed MIDI editor tools, that Cubase has.