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Hobbyists: what is your day (or night) job?

fourier

Member
I'll add something a little bit different: geophysicist turned well planner turned data scientist/engineer/analyst for a major international energy company. Apparently, a professional layoff dodger too: I have made it through about 6 rounds of layoffs in my 8 years there.

The specific type of geophysical data I specialize in is seismic data, which has a lot of overlap with audio analysis. Through university I learned/did the math for both convolution and frequency analysis of a signal (via FFT). I love telling my geoscientist friends that a convolver is a useful musical tool!

Most importantly, I'm a husband and father (adding baby number two very soon...).
My dad is a geophysicist that wrote his thesis on seismic data for earthquake prediction with NORSAR back in the 70s, and he ditched the research job to become a high school teacher.

All the best on the upcoming baby #2!
 

mussnig

Senior Member
I am always in awe of what I call REAL scientists. Cool job!
While it may sound cool for some (I am sure there are lots of people who don't like Mathematics :laugh:), I am not always convinced that it's really useful. My field of research is rather abstract and theoretical, so real-life applications might occur at some point but maybe there will never be any ...
While working as a teacher, I at least had the feeling that I was actively contributing in some way to society. Now the feeling is more vague - I just hope my research will never be used for any kinds of weapons ...

But of course I shouldn't complain. Nobody forced me to do this and there are lots of nice things and freedoms in such a job.
 

doctoremmet

Senior Member
While it may sound cool for some (I am sure there are lots of people who don't like Mathematics :laugh:), I am not always convinced that it's really useful. My field of research is rather abstract and theoretical, so real-life applications might occur at some point but maybe there will never be any ...
While working as a teacher, I at least had the feeling that I was actively contributing in some way to society. Now the feeling is more vague - I just hope my research will never be used for any kinds of weapons ...

But of course I shouldn't complain. Nobody forced me to do this and there are lots of nice things and freedoms in such a job.
Gotcha haha. But your science is way more scientific than my particular academic field, which is part of the economy and business faculty. And we all know economics ain’t science. At least I’m assuming y’all do not really believe that Apple’s stock price is the actual net discounted value of their projected cash flows... ;)
 

mussnig

Senior Member
Gotcha haha. But your science is way more scientific than my particular academic field, which is part of the economy and business faculty. And we all know economics ain’t science. At least I’m assuming y’all do not really believe that Apple’s stock price is the actual net discounted value of their projected cash flows... ;)
Don't underestimate the scientific value of what you are doing! Otherwise there wouldn't be many companies paying top salaries for experts in these things ...
 

mopsiflopsi

Member
Don't underestimate the scientific value of what you are doing! Otherwise there wouldn't be many companies paying top salaries for experts in these things ...
Market value and value for humanity are not the same thing. Hitmen get paid good money too! ;)
Also, never stop an economist from introspection. Wish more of them would be critical of the field’s shortcomings.
 

C.R. Rivera

Popper @ his favorite toy.
I am retired USN, two decades in History at Ohio State, now teaching History parttime at a local community college. I have done history noises for the last few decades. I do NOT make money, nor, do I want to compete with musicians. Rather, I wanted something for myself and my peers that I alone control and enjoy. I decided that pleasing myself was more important. I have a lot of respect for those who struggle to hone your craft, and, fight the powers, so to speak.
 

C.R. Rivera

Popper @ his favorite toy.
Japanese-English translator and supervisory analyst (equity research/fixed income/economics/quants/whatever else they throw at me)

Twenty two years in Japan next month and I still love it here.

I’d love to do library music as a side gig, since music is my passion, but that’s more of a pipe dream I guess.
If you get a chance, look up my name and Akiyama Saneyuki (1868-1918) :cool:
 

DimensionsTomorrow

Active Member
Wow great ! Which place ?
I’m totally fond of Japan (to the point I learned the language).
I’m in Tokyo now, but lived up in Utsunomiya for my first eight years.
It’s really cool that you learned Japanese. That’s not easy if you are living outside the country (not easy living in the country either, lol). I still learn new things pretty much daily even though I have been translating professionally since 2002. Definitely a lifelong project!
 

Loïc D

Monkeying with libraries
I’m in Tokyo now, but lived up in Utsunomiya for my first eight years.
It’s really cool that you learned Japanese. That’s not easy if you are living outside the country (not easy living in the country either, lol). I still learn new things pretty much daily even though I have been translating professionally since 2002. Definitely a lifelong project!
Exactly my feeling. Japan is discovery everyday. You think you know places / people / language / culture / etiquette, and yet there’s always something new on your daily way.
I don’t practice japanese anymore so I forgot a lot. Once in a while I there and I meet friends and also use a bit of japanese with my father-in-law though not our mother language.
I love Tokyo a lot, using my shoes in a lot of places. It’s an incredible city.
 

blender505

New Member
Full time software developer. My dad got me into programming and my mom taught me piano. I studied computer science when I got to college, but I also got a music composition minor. I actually like it this way quite a bit (music being a hobby that is). I don't think I could make it doing music professionally and I get to write the things I want to write instead of what I'm told to write. Plus, I love my current programming job. I work for a bit of a unicorn start up company in that it has all the perks of a start up, but none of the common downsides.
 

C.R. Rivera

Popper @ his favorite toy.
I’m in Tokyo now, but lived up in Utsunomiya for my first eight years.
It’s really cool that you learned Japanese. That’s not easy if you are living outside the country (not easy living in the country either, lol). I still learn new things pretty much daily even though I have been translating professionally since 2002. Definitely a lifelong project!
Yes, very very true! And, to boot, I was working often with furigana sources with the NIDS. Oy vay!! :confused:
 
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