Halion 6 shape of things to come

ZeroZero

Senior Member
I know that people use Kontakt and its the leader in this field for years, it's unlikely there will be a mass migration to Halion. But, Halion has always been a reasonably capable sampler, less scripting in my version (Halion 4).

However, the new Halion 6 is out in February. There are a few teasers but the one that may interest people is the drag and drop facility to create user instruments. Within a few minutes (it seems) it is possible to create a whole instrument layer it, add knobs and assign them to different parameters.

This seems to steal a march (pun intended) from the current version of Kontakt.

It's called the "Macro Page designer" Take a look here:

https://www.steinberg.net/en/produc...at_is_new_in_halion_6_and_halion_sonic_3.html
 
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ZeroZero

ZeroZero

Senior Member
Fair point :) Yet ( don't want to say but) there is some movement here. I think the guy who created that String thing is non 'orchestrally centric' . Hopefully the concept of a drag and drop interface for GUIs is useful, though 'engineering' (e.g. eq) tools is not enough for real.
 

Brian2112

Active Member
Yea. Those are probably the worst strings I've ever heard.
Brass sounds almost as bad.
Don't need more frickin pianos.
Tired of wavetable vomit.

HOWEVER

Halion really is a beast in a lot of ways. Most sounds are very usable and cool, and I love the granular stuff. Lots of sound design possibilities so I plan to upgrade from Halion 5. Probably won't touch the strings though. :P
 

InLight-Tone

Senior Member
Kontakt is of course the go to sampler, but look into UVI Falcon to compliment it and process samples with granular and all the rest. A VERY deep synth/sampler, just bought it and am VERY pleased. The good thing about Halion is of course the Cubase integration.
 
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ZeroZero

ZeroZero

Senior Member
I am just hoping that the drag and drop idea (for controls) would inspire NI for Kontakt 6. The whole family are there and don't want to move down the road. Imagine if there were, for example, a 'real' vibrato dial that provided non mechanical custom vibrato, as a knob, that you could drag and drop onto an 'adjacent' additional gui space. Additional overlay controls. Perhaps another customisable dial specifically for staccato samples so that you could craft your staccato for more/less attack phase, more or less tail. I am a dreamer, but something... along these lines...

Kontakt 'scares' most people, including me (and I code) drag and drop is easy and visually satisfying. I remember Access Database designer programmes that did this - decades ago.
 
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ZeroZero

ZeroZero

Senior Member
Yea. Those are probably the worst strings I've ever heard.
Brass sounds almost as bad.
Don't need more frickin pianos.
Tired of wavetable vomit.

HOWEVER

Halion really is a beast in a lot of ways. Most sounds are very usable and cool, and I love the granular stuff. Lots of sound design possibilities so I plan to upgrade from Halion 5. Probably won't touch the strings though. :P
:) I second that emotion...
 

InLight-Tone

Senior Member
HISE is what developers should be looking at. Much more powerful scripting that any other sampler - http://hise.audio/
That's very interesting and ambitious but I never trust open source projects over the long haul as developers burn out. I trust that UVI will continue to develop Falcon so I'm going to stick with it and you have the Lua language embedded for scripting or even algorithmic midi manipulation ...
 

d.healey

Music Monkey
That's very interesting and ambitious but I never trust open source projects over the long haul as developers burn out. I trust that UVI will continue to develop Falcon so I'm going to stick with it and you have the Lua language embedded for scripting or even algorithmic midi manipulation ...
It's a commercial project so hopefully that will provide incentive for long term development and as it's written in a very standard language with JUCE for UI and well documented it won't be difficult for other developers to fork it or take it on in the future should the current developer lose interest.

I can think of many long lasting open source projects - Linux is a good one ;) I can also think of wonderful proprietary software that the developers neglected (like Kontakt actually) or that was bought up and never seen again like KeyMap Pro. I rather know that if a developer gives up or goes bust I can grab the source code myself and either work on it or pay someone to.

HISE has OOP javascript and it exports directly to VST or AU (including Linux native VST) so doesn't require customers to purchase something like UVI or Kontakt which opens the market up to anyone with a DAW.
 
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InLight-Tone

Senior Member
I hear you and you make good points. I spent a lot of time in Linux myself trying to do in Micro$oft but all that wore me out over time so I caved in to Windows to get some music done...
 

d.healey

Music Monkey
I hear you and you make good points. I spent a lot of time in Linux myself trying to do in Micro$oft but all that wore me out over time so I caved in to Windows to get some music done...
Yeah that's the problem with Linux, not good for more specialized tasks like music production, hopefully it will catch up one day.
 

novaburst

Senior Member
I have Halion 5 not really anything there that will push for a change, it is all colourful and a few things for the EDM guys.

not sure why they don't open up for library integration or is this a script thing, all in all for 2017 it does seem like a lot of fire works and pops and bangs, but nothing really different.
 

Brian2112

Active Member
I can only second that...

I do love the Steinberg team for making Cubase and Nuendo and never really got into Halion, but for sure this is not getting me warmed up.
Despite my earlier mocking, Halion really is pretty cool. Yes the highlighted "libraries" are hideous, but I thought they were in Halion 5 as well. The thing is, very much like UVI Falcon, you can do really sick hybrid stuff. You can mix sampling, analog, granular, FM, and now wavetable all in one patch. It's pretty powerful if you think of it more as a sampling synth than a Kontakt rival. Don't think we'll see CSS on Halion anytime soon but depending on your needs, it's very useful.
 
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ZeroZero

ZeroZero

Senior Member
EDIT:

Just listened...oh dear.

It is possible they will have a thirty day e-Licenser trial on it, so we might be able to determine if the app is truly useful.
FYI they often do have a thirty day trial of VSTs, but only a couple of months after the launch.
 
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ZeroZero

ZeroZero

Senior Member

Are you telling me this isn't the most realistic sampled big band ensemble that's ever graced your ears?
This brass typifies the "Engineering/Musical" divide for me (no dig to engineers here). The engineering approach is all about frequency cut offs, eqs, envelopes and the like, but the musician - the guy that plays the sax never thinks about these things and when they learn to play their instrument they never encounter these terms. They think about embroucher, attack (of the reed) vibtrato (no not the mechanical engineering type) , phrasing, and musical things.
This is why I don't think these 'synthetic controls' have any truly significant meaning for a sax section beyond warping it. Reverb possibly excluded.