General guidance for a hobbyist

roman.i

New Member
Hello everyone,

I'm in a beginning of my musical journey, doing this mostly for fun, for a year or so.
Recently I reached a basic level in playing a piano.
I have some basic experience and knowledge in sound design and mixing as well.
Now I'm trying to find my way into composition.
My goal is to produce music which is kind of a mix between an electronic and cinematic music.
I'm seeking for a general guidance / learning path / course suggestions,
and some feedback if I'm handing in the right direction or not.

Thanks
 

hbjdk

Active Member
I'm in a beginning of my musical journey, doing this mostly for fun, for a year or so.
Recently I reached a basic level in playing a piano.
I have some basic experience and knowledge in sound design and mixing as well.
Now I'm trying to find my way into composition.
My goal is to produce music which is kind of a mix between an electronic and cinematic music.
I started out a few months ago with the same goal as you, so I'm gonna share my experiences and what I've learned so far:

1) Get East West's Composer Cloud:

It's a subscription service which you can cancel any time you want, so you're not "trapped" at all. How long you want to subscribe is completely up to you.

Once you have signed up for CC, check out their (East West's) Hollywood Orchestra. This is one of the biggest bang-for-the-buck deals you can get in the orchestral sample world. Check the sound of it:

- Andrew Barraclough's Youtube channel (best display of Hollywood Orchestra on Youtube)

- East West's own Youtube channel with tutorials on HO (scroll down until you get to the playlist ComposerCloud Tutorial Series):
 

hbjdk

Active Member
2) For electronic sounds, I will recommend the synths from u-he:

Keep in mind you do not have to buy them for full price - you can find them 2nd hand on KVR, which is what I did:

(As usual, be careful who you trust in online trading)

Heavyocity is another interesting company:

They have cinematic drums (Damage) and mangled electronic drums (DM-307) plus other interesting cinematic stuff.

Many people recommend Spectrasonic's Omnisphere for electronic music, but it is expensive:

Omnisphere is also sometimes available as 2nd hand.
 

hbjdk

Active Member
Finally, be careful how you spend your money. Hold on to it! It's easy to get tempted, because there is so much great stuff out there, so you have to be really, really careful in what you choose to get.

Also keep this in mind: Avoid buying software at regular prices. There are so many sales going on in the orchestral sample library world. Black Friday is around the corner, then comes the Holiday sales, then New Year sales etc.
 

DoubleTap

New Member
Finally, be careful how you spend your money. Hold on to it! It's easy to get tempted, because there is so much great stuff out there, so you have to be really, really careful in what you choose to get.

Also keep this in mind: Avoid buying software at regular prices. There are so many sales going on in the orchestral sample library world. Black Friday is around the corner, then comes the Holiday sales, then New Year sales etc.
Good advice. I've probably not got the best possible bargains but my spend averages about half the official list price, which includes things that aren't ever discounted like Serum and a Valhalla plugin. Most things are available at some point for at least half price

I would say though that I began this with the intention of not spending any money at all, and that pushed me down various routes that have ended up either delaying my progress or led to me spending money on things that were superseded quite quickly.
 
OP
R

roman.i

New Member
Fortunately, I've already enough gear and plugins.
My question is about more formal education, rather than random videos on Youtube.
 

dzilizzi

Senior Member
Are you in the U.S.? If you get a library card, most allow you access to Lynda.com for free where they have a lot of good classes. Places like Thinkspace and Groove3 also have good classes. Udemy and Coursera are also good places to go for classes.

If you are talking formal education, a lot of junior/community colleges have basic music theory classes that will get you started. But I wouldn't knock all the free videos on YouTube. There's a lot of really good stuff out there from people who know what they are talking about.
 

el-bo

Senior Member
Fortunately, I've already enough gear and plugins.
My question is about more formal education, rather than random videos on Youtube.
Not sure either of the links that have been offered would be considered random.

One is for a channel of a 'Guy' ( ;) ) who not only gives away great, free YT content, but runs an academy with many levels of courses, for many levels of students.

The other recommendation is both inspirational and aspirational, which is the kind of quality content well worth seeking out.
 

hbjdk

Active Member
Fortunately, I've already enough gear and plugins.
My question is about more formal education, rather than random videos on Youtube.
I read the initial post as if you were looking for “general guidance“, which I then attempted to provide given your situation, but I see now that I misunderstood. That’s what happens sometimes in Internet communication :)