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Garden Studio Room Acoustics

masheenuk

New Member
Hi, I’m new here so firstly apologies if this is in the wrong section.

I’m currently in the process of relocating my studio to a garden log cabin and would like some advice on positioning my studio set up.

The room has been soundproofed with an additional floating wall and ceiling which have 2 layers of soundproofing insulation.

The room dimensions are 4.96x3.96m

My main concern is the height and shape of the ceiling, so looking for guidance on how best to position my equipment and also treat the room.

I have attached a photo of the room and along with some dimensions on a 3D model. I have positioned the desk where I think best, but obviously may not be the best place for it. I shall be laying a laminate floor so ignore the current flooring.

Many thanks.
 

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wst3

Lunatic - it's really that simple
Moderator
Well that is going to pose a challenge or two!

In general the things one thinks about when designing a studio include symmetry (left to right for stereo, a lot more for surround), and getting some space between the front wall and the loudspeakers, the loudspeakers and your ears, and your ears and the rear wall. This is why you will see many suggestions about arranging the room along the long axis.

Which probably won't work for you for a couple reasons:

First, no way I'd want to give up that view! And second, the roof slopes from windows to "rear" wall. So no symmetry for you!

I would still try to divide the space from the front to rear walls to gain some advantage. I'd probably skimp on the distance from the loudspeakers to the front wall to preserve the distance from the loudspeakers to your ears, but I'd shrink that a little bit as well to get some space behind my head.

While we tend to think of absorption as a way to tame room resonances, or "bad" reflections, they are also useful for adding space (well that's the way it sounds to most folks). So plan on some absorption on the front and rear walls not too much thought. ASC sells these 'planks" and I've had some success using them for just this purpose - well using them in conjunction with bigger absorbers.

You will need to do some experimenting, and the layout you drew may not be optimal, but it is as good a place to start as any. Do include a cloud absorber above the mix position, in this case I think that will be very helpful. And that means make it temporary so you can move things about.

The other "rule" that some overlook is that room geometry, and the geometry of the relationship between your ears and monitors, and the boundaries makes as much of a difference and any treatment (except in really bad rooms!)
 
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masheenuk

New Member
Thread starter
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Well that is going to pose a challenge or two!

In general the things one thinks about when designing a studio include symmetry (left to right for stereo, a lot more for surround), and getting some space between the front wall and the loudspeakers, the loudspeakers and your ears, and your ears and the rear wall. This is why you will see many suggestions about arranging the room along the long axis.

Which probably won't work for you for a couple reasons:

First, no way I'd want to give up that view! And second, the roof slopes from windows to "rear" wall. So no symmetry for you!

I would still try to divide the space from the front to rear walls to gain some advantage. I'd probably skimp on the distance from the loudspeakers to the front wall to preserve the distance from the loudspeakers to your ears, but I'd shrink that a little bit as well to get some space behind my head.

While we tend to think of absorption as a way to tame room resonances, or "bad" reflections, they are also useful for adding space (well that's the way it sounds to most folks). So plan on some absorption on the front and rear walls not too much thought. ASC sells these 'planks" and I've had some success using them for just this purpose - well using them in conjunction with bigger absorbers.

You will need to do some experimenting, and the layout you drew may not be optimal, but it is as good a place to start as any. Do include a cloud absorber above the mix position, in this case I think that will be very helpful. And that means make it temporary so you can move things about.

The other "rule" that some overlook is that room geometry, and the geometry of the relationship between your ears and monitors, and the boundaries makes as much of a difference and any treatment (except in really bad rooms!)
Many thanks for your feedback. Would you suggest it’s a matter of trial and error testing whether it will be better positioning the desk along the longest wall as well as how I have it positioned in the 3D model?
 
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