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Fugue for Violin, Cello and Piano No. 2

Lukas K

Member
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Dave Connor

Senior Member
Very nice. Congratulations on such good work. Did you model it on something? It didn't seem like a strict fugue but sectional with a contrasting middle section. Would you describe the form?
EDIT: I think I misinterpreted the ending of the first section when it slowed as new material but it probably just an ending. Then I think you start up again with the subject inverted or RI or something like that.

As far as character it seems to hint at Bartok more than the Russians but it struck me as an original piece to be sure.
 
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Rodney Money

On V.I. avoiding work.
Very nice. Congratulations on such good work. Did you model it on something? It didn't seem like a strict fugue but sectional with a contrasting middle section. Would you describe the form?
Maybe the middle section could be called "an extended episode?"
 

TGV

Senior Member
It has a definite "Shostakovich" feel over it, by which I mean that 20th century Eastern-Europe sound, although it is sometimes very literally Shostakovich (e.g. at 1:10, and the repeated note, strongly remind me of him). Very good work.
 

VincentiZghra

New Member
Like everything except the ending arpeggiation. Everything else was intriguing and nice. Also feel the Shostakovich and maybe a small bit of Prokofiev in this, still with a lot of unique personality as well. Great job.
 
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Lukas K

Lukas K

Member
Thanks a lot guys for your feedback!

Regarding the style/form of the fugue, it was composed as the middle one of the 3-part cycle of fugues for this trio. The first fugue is pretty much in Bach's style and the third one (not composed yet) will be inspired by atonal and serial music. This second fugue is meant to be somewhere in between of those and I have a feeling it's gonna be my favourite one :)

Since I wanted to cross the borders of the standard baroque fugue, so it differs from the first one of the cycle, I intentionally broke couple expected "rules" with the form.

@Dave Connor @Rodney Money Very good observations! The fugue has three sections. Exposition is pretty standard with a little connecting episode made of some parts of the subject at the end of it (0:35-0:45). Development starts with the retrograde of the subject at various pitches, later combined with the inversion of the subject or it's regular version. It all leads to a climax in 1:25 where you can hear the subject with all the 3 counterpoints from the exposition, however, the intervals are diminished to a unison in each part in contrast to the chromatic sequences that led to it. Development ends similarly as the exposition, with some parts of the subject being used to slow down the process to a single violin fermata note. The closing section starts in 1:59 with the retrograde of the subject (this time in the tonic - A). After the entries of the cello and violin you can hear the piano with the original version of the subject in octaves and it all leads to a (maybe unexpected) arpeggio ending.

@TGV @VincentiZghra Regarding the Shostakovich feel of the piece, I think you're spot on. He was my hero when I started composing and I still respect his work a lot.

Thanks again to all of you for taking time to listen to it and giving some feedback! :)
 
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Sebastianmu

Active Member
It's very, very nice. Also reminded me of the Prokofiev Cello Sonata (Op. 119) - I probably just haven't listened enough to Shostakovich to grasp him..
 

Iskra

Active Member
Beautiful, I loved the Bartok/ Shostakovich 'feel' in it. And nice to hear living musicians :)
 
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Lukas K

Lukas K

Member
Beautiful, I loved the Bartok/ Shostakovich 'feel' in it. And nice to hear living musicians :)
Sorry, I didn't notice you already posted a comment to this fugue :)

Thanks a lot! This fugue was fun to compose and practice as well. That 5/4 time signature was an enemy for the players :)
 
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