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Extended for 24hrs: Drum Fury - Apocalyptic Drums - 50% off Intro Pricing

Sample logic

Active Member
Mammoth right out of the box, DRUM FURY will set your cues ablaze!

Sample Logic opens 2019 with a bang... quite literally. DRUM FURY is an extensive 11 GB collection of over 100 apocalyptic KONTAKT drum instruments.

DRUM FURY was recorded at multiple locations; from the legendary scoring stage at Skywalker studios to cavernous spaces including churches and auditoriums.

Get the all new DRUM FURY now at an introductory price of $99.99 (instead of $199.99) for a limited time only!

Learn more: https://www.samplelogic.com/products/drum-fury/

AT A GLANCE
  • 113 instruments
  • 10.64 GB Sample Content / 35,149 Samples
  • Powerful Mastering Tools via Energizer and Polisher
  • Entirely streamlined interface
  • Built for full Kontakt retail 5.8.1 or higher
  • Essential parameter controls to shift keymap range to stack multiple instruments and create custom ensembles
SoundCloud Demos

Videos
 
OP
Sample logic

Sample logic

Active Member
Thanks, Guys,
We are very proud of this release. :)

We actually gave a few copies out to some A list composers just to take the temperature on their thoughts of the product and here is what they had to say... will update as more feedback comes in

Charlie Clouser
“Drum sounds are always a matter of taste, and the ones in DRUM FURY taste really good to me. With a wide variety of massive taikos and twangy darbukas and djembes alongside more conventional instruments like tympani and toms, there’s a lot to choose from, and with the wide variety of mic positions it’s easy for me to find distant, thunderous taikos and layer them with sharper toms to build massive drum parts. A great addition to my scoring template. Well done Sample Logic!”

Benjamin Pinkerton
“I’d buy this drum library for the thundering tom ensembles and the taikos! Everything else in the library is gravy, and who doesn’t love gravy. The world percussion is great and the cinematic hits are awesome! And that energizer knob is fantastically obnoxious...perfect for drums!”

Gary Rottger
"Love this library. The samples are clean and crisp with a nice dynamic range.
The concert bass drum is deep and punchy. The Rubs and Rolls are KILLER!
Taikos, Toms and more this is a great library to add to your percussion arsenal.”

James Sizemore

"Just what I need for drums & percussion. DRUM FURY makes it easy to select from multiple mic positions to fit just the sound I’m looking for, while also containing some of the most innovative sounds I’ve ever heard in a percussion instrument”

Jeff Rona
"DRUM FURY is not just another big drum library. This is some of the best recorded, edited and programmed percussion I've come across. Instantly useable, even without a single additional plugin. This is a no brainer, "go to" percussion suite of the highest order. Amazing."

Clinton Shorter
“DRUM FURY is an extremely versatile percussion library that effortlessly delivers whatever drum sound I'm looking for. The Energizer and Polisher faders are especially good for shaping sounds and getting them to sit perfectly in the mix. I highly recommend it!”

Tom Salta
"I’ll be honest… I wasn’t expecting any raised eyebrows while checking out yet another traditional percussion library… but DRUM FURY did it. Just when I thought I had my bases covered, DRUM FURY carved its way right to the top with more than a few amazing sounding instruments. This is the first percussion library I’ve heard that excels in both traditional and modern percussion and will allow me to replace some of the staple instruments I’ve been using for decades. Hands down… this is Sample Logic’s best percussion library.”

Trevor Morris
“DRUM FURY is on point. Responsive under the fingers which inspires playability, euphonic in its recording and a simple yet tweakable GUI. Sounds big and Cinematic, just the way I like my drums”

Jesper Kyd

"I love DRUM FURY! These deep sampled percussion instruments are very realistic and I was able to put this library to use right away. DRUM FURY has become an important part of my percussion toolkit."

Cris Velasco
“In a virtual sea of percussion libraries, DRUM FURY has found a place in my template recently. No loops, and not over produced. It's just a well recorded library that sounds like the real thing, and it sits perfectly within the context of my orchestral arrangements.”
 
Thanks, Guys,
We are very proud of this release. :)

We actually gave a few copies out to some A list composers just to take the temperature on their thoughts of the product and here is what they had to say... will update as more feedback comes in
I'm also willing to take the temperature! Sounds pretty hot! Send me a copy and you will be able to add the feedback of the famous Sunny Fable!! Please?.. :2thumbs:
 

rrichard63

Perpetual Novice
It appears that the several mic positions are all in separate patches. To mix them, you would have to set up a Kontakt multi. Is this common in large drum/percussion libraries?
 

emasters

Active Member
It appears that the several mic positions are all in separate patches. To mix them, you would have to set up a Kontakt multi. Is this common in large drum/percussion libraries?
I was wondering why SL took this approach (separate NKI's for microphone positions), versus having all the microphone positions in a single NKI with the ability to blend? Seems a bit cumbersome, but perhaps there's a benefit to the multi NKI approach? Overall, seems like a nice library - very playable, instruments sound good. And appreciate the intro discount.
 

X-Bassist

Senior Member
Mammoth right out of the box, DRUM FURY will set your cues ablaze!

Sample Logic opens 2019 with a bang... quite literally. DRUM FURY is an extensive 11 GB collection of over 100 apocalyptic KONTAKT drum instruments.

DRUM FURY was recorded at multiple locations; from the legendary scoring stage at Skywalker studios to cavernous spaces including churches and auditoriums.

Get the all new DRUM FURY now at an introductory price of $99.99 (instead of $199.99) for a limited time only!

Learn more: https://www.samplelogic.com/products/drum-fury/

AT A GLANCE
  • 113 instruments
  • 10.64 GB Sample Content / 35,149 Samples
  • Powerful Mastering Tools via Energizer and Polisher
  • Entirely streamlined interface
  • Built for full Kontakt retail 5.8.1 or higher
  • Essential parameter controls to shift keymap range to stack multiple instruments and create custom ensembles
SoundCloud Demos

Videos
How many velocity layers and round robins?
 

Steve Lum

Member
Either Reuben is an audio hypnotist or this is infinitely compelling on its own... it's both methinks. Done! Gimme!
 

reutunes

Senior Member
Either Reuben is an audio hypnotist or this is infinitely compelling on its own... it's both methinks. Done! Gimme!
Thank you. I don't even see myself as being particularly good at drum programming. Maybe Drum Fury brought the best out in me as those little DAW bits in the video didn't take me too long to put together. If there's enough call for it I might have the time to do a livestream next week, using the library as the basis for a track. Let me know if that's something that appeals to anyone.
 

zvenx

Senior Member
It appears that the several mic positions are all in separate patches. To mix them, you would have to set up a Kontakt multi. Is this common in large drum/percussion libraries?
This was the dealbreaker for me watching the walk through.
I personally like one patch that I can configure how I want, make snapshots etc...
One patch per everything is a guarantee that I will not really use it.
rsp
 

Mystic

Senior Member
After watching the walkthrough there, I feel like I'm left with far more questions. Most of the patches here could have been put into a single patch across the keyboard and changed with keyswitching or at least added another section on for things like finger rolls as Nick was showing didn't exist. The separate mic patches are also really strange when they should have been built into the GUI rather than separate patches. @Sample logic What was the reasoning behind doing it this way?
 
OP
Sample logic

Sample logic

Active Member
hi guys
just an update here is another great walkthrough video that Just came in from Sample Library Review:

Also, a nice quote Just came through from Steve Jablonsky Composer of the Transformers movies:

STEVE JABLONSKY
"If I were to create a percussion library it would look a lot like DRUM FURY. The sounds are expertly recorded with a ton of different dynamic, tonal and mic options. And the interface is what I love to see.....big faders, big knobs, cleanly laid out. There will be no digging around for what I need with this fantastic UI. Great sounds, great UI, great instrument. Sample Logic have done it again".
 
Not to speak for Sample Logic on why they designed Drum Fury as they did, but I am finding extremely easy to stack and layer sounds--I just add different instruments into the same Kontakt instance and they are triggered by the same midi notes. It's a really quick way to achieve the sound you're looking for.
 

charlieclouser

Senior Member
I with @ArtTurnerMusic in that it's nice to be able to stack a bunch of single, fast-loading, low-memory instruments into a Kontakt multi - the whole stacked multi then loads quicker than most multi-mic, multi-drum, multi-articulation libs like HZ01 or whatever. It's quick-n-easy.

I've done my rock drum libraries this way forever - map all kicks/snares/toms/hats/cyms to the same sets of MIDI notes, and save each as an individual program/instrument. So I'd have hundreds of snare instruments, each occupying only four MIDI notes, each with X number of samples mapped to respond as closely as possible to the ideal. Some had dozens of velocity splits and different articulations (left hand, right hand, edge, drag) on the four notes, and some had just a single sample mapped across all four notes with velocity>filter and velocity>sample start to try and simulate those various articulations.

With a setup like that I can load multiple kick instruments to build stacks with, for instance, an Andy Wallace kick for point, a Kashmir kick for boof, a 909 for tone, and an Albini kick for room. You can load up as many as you want, and if you want to set one aside for a minute but not un-load it, just mute it or change it to an unused MIDI channel. They all stack up on the same MIDI notes and they all trigger as you record your performance, but you can adjust relative volumes, set individual outputs, etc. for each and it's way simpler than opening the hood on the individual instruments. Save the multi for that song and you're done, and you haven't edited the source instruments so you haven't messed up any other songs that use them.

Stacking drums in most libs requires duplicating MIDI tracks, or duplicating and transposing sets of notes, etc. - and this means you're not hearing the full stack until after you've recorded, edited, and duplicated the MIDI, unless you use an input transformer on your MIDI, but this is time-consuming and fiddly - and when you need to make edits you're dealing with multiple tracks, unless you use Logic's "ghost regions" feature. But even with those enhancements it's still more clumsy and fragile than just stacking inside the samplers. I often do the same thing when stacking strings, brass, etc.

So I was pleasantly surprised to see how Drum Fury was laid out, since it's very similar to how I've done drums forever.
 

axb312

Senior Member
hi guys
just an update here is another great walkthrough video that Just came in from Sample Library Review:

Also, a nice quote Just came through from Steve Jablonsky Composer of the Transformers movies:

STEVE JABLONSKY
"If I were to create a percussion library it would look a lot like DRUM FURY. The sounds are expertly recorded with a ton of different dynamic, tonal and mic options. And the interface is what I love to see.....big faders, big knobs, cleanly laid out. There will be no digging around for what I need with this fantastic UI. Great sounds, great UI, great instrument. Sample Logic have done it again".
How many dynamic layers and round robins?
 

X-Bassist

Senior Member
I with @ArtTurnerMusic in that it's nice to be able to stack a bunch of single, fast-loading, low-memory instruments into a Kontakt multi - the whole stacked multi then loads quicker than most multi-mic, multi-drum, multi-articulation libs like HZ01 or whatever. It's quick-n-easy.

I've done my rock drum libraries this way forever - map all kicks/snares/toms/hats/cyms to the same sets of MIDI notes, and save each as an individual program/instrument. So I'd have hundreds of snare instruments, each occupying only four MIDI notes, each with X number of samples mapped to respond as closely as possible to the ideal. Some had dozens of velocity splits and different articulations (left hand, right hand, edge, drag) on the four notes, and some had just a single sample mapped across all four notes with velocity>filter and velocity>sample start to try and simulate those various articulations.

With a setup like that I can load multiple kick instruments to build stacks with, for instance, an Andy Wallace kick for point, a Kashmir kick for boof, a 909 for tone, and an Albini kick for room. You can load up as many as you want, and if you want to set one aside for a minute but not un-load it, just mute it or change it to an unused MIDI channel. They all stack up on the same MIDI notes and they all trigger as you record your performance, but you can adjust relative volumes, set individual outputs, etc. for each and it's way simpler than opening the hood on the individual instruments. Save the multi for that song and you're done, and you haven't edited the source instruments so you haven't messed up any other songs that use them.

Stacking drums in most libs requires duplicating MIDI tracks, or duplicating and transposing sets of notes, etc. - and this means you're not hearing the full stack until after you've recorded, edited, and duplicated the MIDI, unless you use an input transformer on your MIDI, but this is time-consuming and fiddly - and when you need to make edits you're dealing with multiple tracks, unless you use Logic's "ghost regions" feature. But even with those enhancements it's still more clumsy and fragile than just stacking inside the samplers. I often do the same thing when stacking strings, brass, etc.

So I was pleasantly surprised to see how Drum Fury was laid out, since it's very similar to how I've done drums forever.
Thanks Charlie, good perspective. Can you check the drums to see how many velocity layers (if the mapping in Kontakt shows you and there is no scripting that changes the setup) and how many round robins (how often groups change in the groups window when playing a single drum)?

Even a few of each would be better than what I suspect, 1 and 1. But with GB of short drum samples, anything is possible without blowing up the size too much.
 
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