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Eis and m.i.t.a

mibarbaro

New Member
Hi everybody,
Anyone knows if there is any relation between the M.I.T.A (Music Interval Theory Academy) method and ESI? The technics they (MITA) claim they teach sound very similar to what EIS does. As I have checked, EIS seems to be brutal expensive for me, especially due to the currency conversion, and M.I.T.A would be a very nice alternative.

Any help or tip would be welcome!
Thank you!
Michel.
 
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Craig Sharmat

Moderator
Moderator
M.I.T.A was formed from 2 graduates of E.I.S. fairly recently. There will be some similar thought process but M.I.T.A went in their own direction. E.I.S is a much longer course but no one says you have to finish it though of course finishing it would give you a tremendous amount of information. I have not taken M.I.T.A. and will not based on I have enough info from E.I.S.. If you check the list of students and graduates from E.I.S. it has a long and impressive history. I think that a course like M.I.T.A. is a testament to what Spud Murphy did years ago creating E.I.S.. M.I.T.A is not a spinoff of E.I.S. though it's owners were certainly influenced by it. I do like how they are modernizing the approach using videos and certain technologies. E.I.S. is way too deep as I would assume M.I.T.A. is to be able to explain what you will get out of each course outside of hollow promises that you will succeed. That is always up to the individual applying himself. I have heard great E.I.S. composers and others where I went that's just ok, same for M.I.T.A.. EIS has a much longer list of successful composers just based on longevity.

Frank from M.I.T.A. should show up shortly with his pitch...:)
 

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
Music that uses intervals?!?!?! COPYRIGHT STRIKE!

I did interval ear training - I think I'll open up I.E.T. school and have threads about how they are "probably very similar" because it involves using intervals[keyword] and math(s) to make "music". No other music outside of mita or eis use "intervals".

that's dripping with sarcasm if you cant tell XD

I haven't taken either - but I have to say people making essentially baseless speculations and watching people explain over and over certainly gets old. I can click off of the thread, but the poor instructors are stuck trying to clean up the mess... I guess I don't have the same level of patience - to me it just seems bonkers.

I've taken highschool geometry - as a past student of high school geometry - I'm sure calc and trig are the same thing, BOTH TEACHERS TOOK HIGHSCHOOL GEOMETRY
 

Blackster

Senior Member
I have not taken M.I.T.A. and will not ...
Frank from M.I.T.A. should show up shortly with his pitch...:)

It's funny that you (Craig) put so much energy into trying to explain where EIS stands next to MITA.

Even if I totally could go into details and show 1,000 differences between EIS and MITA, I consider this to be wasted energy. Instead, I'd like to point out only ONE difference and that is found in the mindset and philosophy:

MITA is the most supporting and open-minded community that I've ever seen in my whole life. Knowledge gets shared amongst all members in our Facebook group and in the forum with no holding back and 100% transparency. We even share knowledge and give insight into what we do regularly in our live streams! We've just finished the last one 4 hours ago! :) ... I totally invite everybody to watch the replay as it's entertaining and educating at the same time. We even go into the actual assignment from Marc Bercovitz who also took EIS before for a few years. He is showing and explaining the work that he wrote with the tools for Lesson 53 of the MITA Composition course.

So, here's the replay of our MITA Round-Table: :)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Edit: That's weird, the link doesn't come through on my end. Does it work for anybody? If not, I've just posted the video to my own timeline in Facebook, so you should be able to access it from there: https://www.facebook.com/frank.herrlinger

If it still doesn't work for you guys, I'll polish the audio of the replay quite soon and will upload it to YouTube. This link I can share for sure without any problems! ...
 
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Nathanael Iversen

Active Member
I studied through Book Two with Craig in EIS. Craig is an excellent teacher, composer, guitarist and human being. If you have an honest interest in EIS, I would recommend that you speak with him. He has taught many people, and can both demonstrate and apply all the techniques professionally. He was always helpful to me and my progress as a musician.

I am about 1/3rd done with the main composition course in MITA. I have a financial interest in neither.

They are indeed very different courses, as Craig indicates. This difference extends from intent, to organization, scope-and-sequence, approach and even to the way homework is done. They are not "fungible" to use an economic term. They are different things and produce different results - having different aims.

Both are long term investments of time, money, and life energy. They are not "for everyone", in the same way that university study is not for everyone, or any other activity you might imagine. But for some, they are an ideal pathway. Only you can decide that.

Both sets of instructors will patiently spend time with you to assess what you are looking for and if it will fit. Both are big enough commitments that you aren't going to want to make them off of some random forum posts. You want to speak directly to the responsible parties.

I have found the right pathway for my development in MITA, but I use the voice-leading I learned in EIS every day. My familiarity with EIS basics made shifting to MITA quite easy. These are rigorous courses covering concepts that are not part of an undergraduate music theory/composition track. These courses are taught inside of a mentorship, personal-relationship model - not dissimilar to how Nadia Boulanger held court in Paris. Yes there are exercises, but they exist in the context of a relationship and effort to apply the concepts practically.

Both courses are the opposite of an instant-gratification mindset of watching a YouTube and winning an Oscar 5 min later from a "hot tip". They are for the curious, the hungry, and those who didn't find all they wanted through traditional coursework. Most of the students in both are working professional musicians with formal training and degrees. That should tell you something. They aren't re-buying information they got in University.

The real question is if you can write everything you want to be able to write given the training you have? Would learning an alternate approach to thinking about the same 12 notes help with your journey or do you already know enough to do everything you want to do? Do you need or want mentorship in developing as a writer? Both courses offer solutions to that problem, though definitely framed differently in each case.

If you go to Facebook, and watch the current round table discussion, you can listen to one of the compositions I did months ago, and see what my completed homework looked like at that time, and hear my explanation of how it was done. Naturally, I have progressed since then, and am more capable, but it is a data point from my journey. That is probably more useful than anything I could say here.

Learning systems that promote hard work over a long period of time are very popular with some and deeply unpopular with others... As this thread may illustrate before it is complete. But both courses are run by professional, competent, delightful human beings for whom I have enduring respect. You should ignore the trolls if they appear here.
 

Craig Sharmat

Moderator
Moderator
It's funny that you (Craig) put so much energy into trying to explain where EIS stands next to MITA.

Even if I totally could go into details and show 1,000 differences between EIS and MITA, I consider this to be wasted energy. Instead, I'd like to point out only ONE difference and that is found in the mindset and philosophy:

Frank, I put very little effort in explaining M.I.T.A. knowing you would show up and do a better job than I. Personally I hold no animosity toward M.I.T.A, though I feel you have some toward E.I.S. possibly because of past legal dealings (be aware I was not a part of that). I like that another method has spawned out of E.I.S., from an educational standpoint how can that be a bad thing. My suggestion is to be civil and both methods can benefit moving forward.
 
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mibarbaro

New Member
Thread starter
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Hi guys,

First of all I’d like to apologize!

You know, only after I have posted the thread, I realized the sh**t I had done! :) I really should have asked about M.I.T.A directly to them (M.I.T.A contact and support), not in a passionate EIS users forum. I even tried to delete the post but couldn't find where to do it.
Even so, people were so kind and instructive in their replies. Thank you so much for that!

I ended up enrolling the M.I.T.A. monthly plan course and I am really enjoying it.

But I am still really interested in discovery this fascinating and, for sure, proven EIS method. As soom as the economy and things get better in my country, this course is in my top list.

All my best!
 

Farkle

Senior Member
Congratulations, that's awesome!

Honestly, there are so many "ways to the top of the mountain", finding one that works for you, gets you inspired, and helps you compose better and better... that's the one you should take.

EIS, M.I.T.A., private Lessons (Leon Willett is an amazing private comp instructor), etc., whatever works for you, baby! :P

Mike
 
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