*Edit* I made a mistake ...

Discussion in 'OFF-TOPICS - General Musings' started by FriFlo, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. dzilizzi

    dzilizzi I know nothing

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    Somewhere near Los Angeles
    My need for anonymity has more to do with my RL job. I don't need someone at work coming after me because someone found something I said offensive, even if it wasn't meant to be. Or job related advice that I'm not supposed to give in a public forum.

    My niece used to share everything on public Facebook. Getting drunk, doing drugs, sharing questionably offensive jokes going around - all the things an older teenager/college student does. I would keep telling her she didn't want to be so public about these things. She finally got smart when she started looking for jobs and realized employers look at these things now.
     
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  2. DarkestShadow

    DarkestShadow Senior Member

    Not necessarily.
    If I'm for example active in a music group and a label owner see me and checks my music because I post some interesting stuff... that's absolutely not advertising.
    And the other factor is that some people with jobs simply are in the "composer-network" that exists on FB... basically part of that constellation that accepts everyone with mutual friends and music/audio affiliation. So, basically there is a good chance to be connected with someone like this on FB already... and they may simply be seeing what you post in their feed anyway. Since they decided to accept (or even add themselves) you as friend I would hardly call that advertising. Social media is for posting about stuff you do and think... which obviously includes music.,
    But what ever we wanna call that - FB makes it quite convenient. :P
    Of one should not limit oneself to that platform.
     
  3. Polkasound

    Polkasound Senior Member

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    Milwaukee, WI
    I don't like it either, but I think people do it for the sake of convenience. Within the last ten years, at least half of the polka bands who maintained websites have abandoned their sites in favor of using Facebook. Facebook costs nothing, requires no maintenance, requires no technical knowledge to use, and generates instant feedback from fans. For many bandleaders, these conveniences outweigh the fact that their promoting no longer reaches the general public.

    Even though a lot of my friends, fans, and fellow bandleaders have jumped on the Facebook-only wagon for giving and receiving information, I still maintain a website and use email exclusively. I've been using email since 1994 and running my website since 1996. A social media presence with fan interaction would certainly be a boon to my business, but I'd still prioritize my email accessibility and web presence.
     
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  4. Polkasound

    Polkasound Senior Member

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    Actually it is, depending on your perspective.

    About twenty years ago, I had an opportunity to soak in the wisdom of a renown music promoter shortly before he passed away. One of his key pieces of advice was to always keep your name out there. Everywhere people look and listen, make sure they see and hear you. So following that advice, your posting in the music group is advertising. Even if your intent is not to promote yourself, you're still promoting yourself. Anything one does which garners attention which could intentionally or unintentionally lead to a business gain can be considered advertising. And it can be something as innocuous as a passing thought posted on VI-Control.
     
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  5. ghostnote

    ghostnote Vincit qui se vincit.

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    I actually like facebook to stay in touch with my real life friends, but I also got licensing inquiries trough PMs. I think it's great if you don't take it too serious and ignore all the unnecessary stuff.
     
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  6. DarkestShadow

    DarkestShadow Senior Member

    Ah, the modern day illness of making specific terms incredibly wide and all encompassing... paying for a banner on Vi is advertising, just like someone posting a passing thought.
    If the term would actually be so wide (good that it isn't) noone would know what is meant with advertising...

    Rule on a forum: No advertising at all! - Polka and likers: "So, I can't post anything??"
    Lulz.

    Just because something can have a certain effect doesn't mean it that thing. Otherwise going a festival or so is dating. Because it can certainly lead to that. Not a reason to call merely going to a festival dating.
    Same goes for mere online presence and accidental discovery by people with a job.
     
  7. Polkasound

    Polkasound Senior Member

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    Milwaukee, WI
    This is exactly why I started my post with "...depending on your perspective." From your perspective, it's not advertising. From a music promoter's perspective, it is.

    I respect your opinion that the definitions of words cannot or should not extend beyond whatever Oxford prints in their dictionary, but the connotative use of words is very common in modern vernacular.

    A simple post to a music forum can be all the following:

    Recreation - because its fun
    A brain exercise - because you're formulating thoughts
    A typing exercise - because you're increasing your keyboard typing skills
    Advertising - because your music is reaching the public
    Networking - because you are connecting with others in your field

    Sometimes when someone posts something on VI-Control about one of my libraries, it generates a sale. The post was not intended as an ad, but it worked like one. So yes, the mere mention of product in an online forum is, connotatively speaking, advertising.
     
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