What's new

Dry Piano VSTs

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
Further to the C.Bechstein Digital Grand (Kontakt version) here's a short passage I played with the Side Mic perspective fully Dry, then with 55% of the built in Chamber Reverb, and then with 55% Chamber Reverb + some Exponential Audio Nimbus Neutral Hall reverb as well.

The C.Bechstein Digital Grand has a lot going on "under the hood" when you adjust the settings (of which there are many). For example the built in reverb doesn't just get thrown over the top of the Dry sound - there are subtle behind the scenes adjustments happening to achieve the most natural result.

Being C.Bechstein's own product, it's an extremely well conceived, sampled and programmed sampled piano. I've worked with it on many tracks for myself, and for producing tracks for digital piano based pianists (ie. they don't use a DAW).
 

Attachments

  • C.Bechstein Digital-DRY.mp3
    1.4 MB · Views: 11
  • C.Bechstein Digital-Chamber.mp3
    1.4 MB · Views: 7
  • C.Bechstein Digital-Chamber+Nimbus.mp3
    1.4 MB · Views: 7

Scalms

Active Member
Further to the C.Bechstein Digital Grand (Kontakt version) here's a short passage I played with the Side Mic perspective fully Dry, then with 55% of the built in Chamber Reverb, and then with 55% Chamber Reverb + some Exponential Audio Nimbus Neutral Hall reverb as well.

The C.Bechstein Digital Grand has a lot going on "under the hood" when you adjust the settings (of which there are many). For example the built in reverb doesn't just get thrown over the top of the Dry sound - there are subtle behind the scenes adjustments happening to achieve the most natural result.

Being C.Bechstein's own product, it's an extremely well conceived, sampled and programmed sampled piano. I've worked with it on many tracks for myself, and for producing tracks for digital piano based pianists (ie. they don't use a DAW).
Very nice! wow, this piano has such clarity. I'm beginning to fully think and appreciate that Teldex engineers are a big part of generating OT's beautiful and transparent sound, as you can hear it in this piano too. thanks for showcasing this.

Was this the full version or essentials? I was thinking of starting with Essentials but wasn't sure if it was too limiting or not.
 

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
Very nice! wow, this piano has such clarity. I'm beginning to fully think and appreciate that Teldex engineers are a big part of generating OT's beautiful and transparent sound, as you can hear it in this piano too. thanks for showcasing this.

Was this the full version or essentials? I was thinking of starting with Essentials but wasn't sure if it was too limiting or not.
This is the full version, which has 26 velocity layers with 3 separate mic perspectives:
Front facing Mid-Side, Side, and Top (above the hammers) + a set of 'AURA' samples which are body resonances. The M/S mic allows changing the sound from a true mono signal through to a wide stereo image. It's a pristine sounding piano with a lot of dynamics.

The Essentials has a single stereo mix and 10 velocity layers, so quite a 'Lite' version compared to the Full edition. BTW, I've never seen it on sale (not even on an intro price).
 

Scalms

Active Member
This is the full version, which has 26 velocity layers with 3 separate mic perspectives:
Front facing Mid-Side, Side, and Top (above the hammers) + a set of 'AURA' samples which are body resonances. The M/S mic allows changing the sound from a true mono signal through to a wide stereo image. It's a pristine sounding piano with a lot of dynamics.

The Essentials has a single stereo mix and 10 velocity layers, so quite a 'Lite' version compared to the Full edition. BTW, I've never seen it on sale (not even on an intro price).
good to know! thanks for the details
 

Scalms

Active Member
Yep, I just got the full Digital Bechstein recently and it's an absolute beauty. Definitely in the top class (VSL etc) of piano VIs.
I will save up my pennies then :). I haven't read too much about this piano here at VIC, it must be an "undiscovered" gem, even though it's been around awhile
 
OP
R

Robert Lund

New Member
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #29
Further to the C.Bechstein Digital Grand (Kontakt version) here's a short passage I played with the Side Mic perspective fully Dry, then with 55% of the built in Chamber Reverb, and then with 55% Chamber Reverb + some Exponential Audio Nimbus Neutral Hall reverb as well.

The C.Bechstein Digital Grand has a lot going on "under the hood" when you adjust the settings (of which there are many). For example the built in reverb doesn't just get thrown over the top of the Dry sound - there are subtle behind the scenes adjustments happening to achieve the most natural result.

Being C.Bechstein's own product, it's an extremely well conceived, sampled and programmed sampled piano. I've worked with it on many tracks for myself, and for producing tracks for digital piano based pianists (ie. they don't use a DAW).
I finally got around to listening to this. Thanks for posting it. The dry version is definitely what I am interested in.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CGR
OP
R

Robert Lund

New Member
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #30
Very nice! wow, this piano has such clarity. I'm beginning to fully think and appreciate that Teldex engineers are a big part of generating OT's beautiful and transparent sound, as you can hear it in this piano too. thanks for showcasing this.

Was this the full version or essentials? I was thinking of starting with Essentials but wasn't sure if it was too limiting or not.
Clarity is the right word.
 
OP
R

Robert Lund

New Member
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
Further to the C.Bechstein Digital Grand (Kontakt version) here's a short passage I played with the Side Mic perspective fully Dry, then with 55% of the built in Chamber Reverb, and then with 55% Chamber Reverb + some Exponential Audio Nimbus Neutral Hall reverb as well.

The C.Bechstein Digital Grand has a lot going on "under the hood" when you adjust the settings (of which there are many). For example the built in reverb doesn't just get thrown over the top of the Dry sound - there are subtle behind the scenes adjustments happening to achieve the most natural result.

Being C.Bechstein's own product, it's an extremely well conceived, sampled and programmed sampled piano. I've worked with it on many tracks for myself, and for producing tracks for digital piano based pianists (ie. they don't use a DAW).
CGR - Assuming you have the VSL Bösendorfer 280VC, how would you compare it to the C. Bechstein DP in terms of dryness and overall sound?
 

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
CGR - Assuming you have the VSL Bösendorfer 280VC, how would you compare it to the C. Bechstein DP in terms of dryness and overall sound?
I have the VSL Bösendorfer 280VC full edition. The C.Bechstein Digital is considerably dryer. It was sampled in a space at Teldex Studio with intentionally no room reflections or ambience, so what you get is the pure sound of the piano strings, soundboard and body resonance. I can hear the room even in the close mics of the 280VC, especially in the releases. It's certainly more controllable than the Synchron Stage A pianos, but still noticeable.

With the C.Bechstein Digital, I use a little of the built-in reverb (either Room or Chamber for a touch of early reflections) and then external reverb to introduce some depth & space. I did spend considerable time trialling different reverbs to achieve the best combination for my ears (East West Spaces, Best Service Halls of Fame IRs, Valhalla Room) and have settled on Exponential Audio Phoenix and Nimbus Reverbs. They seem to gel the best with the piano for my taste, and have plenty of controls to tailor the interaction with the dry signal.
 
OP
R

Robert Lund

New Member
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #33
I have the VSL Bösendorfer 280VC full edition. The C.Bechstein Digital is considerably dryer. It was sampled in a space at Teldex Studio with intentionally no room reflections or ambience, so what you get is the pure sound of the piano strings, soundboard and body resonance. I can hear the room even in the close mics of the 280VC, especially in the releases. It's certainly more controllable than the Synchron Stage A pianos, but still noticeable.

With the C.Bechstein Digital, I use a little of the built-in reverb (either Room or Chamber for a touch of early reflections) and then external reverb to introduce some depth & space. I did spend considerable time trialling different reverbs to achieve the best combination for my ears (East West Spaces, Best Service Halls of Fame IRs, Valhalla Room) and have settled on Exponential Audio Phoenix and Nimbus Reverbs. They seem to gel the best with the piano for my taste, and have plenty of controls to tailor the interaction with the dry signal.
Thank you. This is very helpful. I have come to learn that the 280VC was sampled in a different Synchron space than the D-274, CFX and (Synchron) B. Imperial and was wondering how much difference that made. I have other reverbs too that I could potentially apply to the Bechstein, such as Altiverb etc.., but now I will stop wondering if the 280VC is comparable to the Bechstein in terms of dryness.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CGR

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
Thank you. This is very helpful. I have come to learn that the 280VC was sampled in a different Synchron space than the D-274, CFX and (Synchron) B. Imperial and was wondering how much difference that made. I have other reverbs too that I could potentially apply to the Bechstein, such as Altiverb etc.., but now I will stop wondering if the 280VC is comparable to the Bechstein in terms of dryness.
My pleasure - hope it helps. Attached are a few chords (without sustain pedal) with the C.Bechstein DG Side Perspective followed by the VSL 280VC Close Mic. No Reverb on either. You can hear how much dryer the C.Bechstein DG is.

View attachment C.Bechstein DG Side-VSL 280VC Close.mp3
 
Last edited:

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
Thanks so much. C. Bechstein is clearly drier.
Regarding sound, I'm leaning towards a preference for the C.Bechstein DG. It's more balanced across the range than the 280VC, and I can seem to make it work across a wider range of music.

Still a big fan of the VSL pianos, but I could probably do without the 280VC (I also have the Bosendorfer Upright Full, Bluthner Grand Full, Bosendorfer Imperial Standard and Steinway Lite).
 
OP
R

Robert Lund

New Member
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #37
On the subject of VSL Pianos, I have the full version of all but the Synchron Bosendorfers (Imperial & 280VC). In my quest for the driest experience, I set the levels of the Condenser, Tube, Ribbon, Mid 1 and Mid 2 mics to 0db and all others off. Sympathetic resonance -inf dB (which loads up as the default for some strange reason). I have yet to play with reducing the RS Level from 0 dB.

It's better. I have a new found appreciation for the clarity of the samples which seem to be on a par with the Bechstein DP. But the Bechstein just seems to default to what I am looking for - even with the effects enabled.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CGR

sostenuto

NKS Fan !
Regarding sound, I'm leaning towards a preference for the C.Bechstein DG. It's more balanced across the range than the 280VC, and I can seem to make it work across a wider range of music.

Still a big fan of the VSL pianos, but I could probably do without the 280VC (I also have the Bosendorfer Upright Full, Bluthner Grand Full, Bosendorfer Imperial Standard and Steinway Lite).
Appreciate such ongoing detail for C.Bechstein and now top of short list.
OTH, frustrated with sole source being Thomann.de _ priced in GBP vs Euro.

Essential @ $128. from Site (Euro) vs Thomann (GBP) $150.
DG @ $247. from Site (Euro) _ $290 from Thomann.

Thomann exclusive choice seems limiting. 🤷🏻‍♂️
 

davinwv

Active Member
I also have the Bosendorfer Upright Full, Bluthner Grand Full, Bosendorfer Imperial Standard and Steinway Lite).

I've seen the "Lite" versions of the Synchron pianos mentioned a few times, but I only see the Standard and Full versions listed on VSL's site. What are the Lite versions and where does one purchase them?
 

CGR

Pianist, Composer & Arranger
I've seen the "Lite" versions of the Synchron pianos mentioned a few times, but I only see the Standard and Full versions listed on VSL's site. What are the Lite versions and where does one purchase them?
There is only one piano available as a Lite edition, which is the Steinway D included as part of the SYNCRON-ized Special Edition VOL 1. The piano has separate close and room mics, and around 30 velocity layers (the Standard & Full edition pianos have 60+ velocity layers and multiple mic perspectives).
 
Top Bottom