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Doug Gibson EIS compositions thread

I recently devolved into EIS after hearing a number of pieces here on this forum. I have to say I have really been enjoying my lessons. I though I would create a space to post some of my compositions based on the lessons. I have just completed book 2.
The first one here is based on the natural minor 9th (lesson 9). Perhaps predictablly the result sounds "noir"-ish. Would love honest feedback on the composition. I used EIS to create the entire profession for the piece, and the main melody. For the improv sections essentially it free, in the harmonic sense, in that it combines traditional diatonic and chromatic passages on top of the EIS progressions.

[flash width=450 height=110 loop=false]http://player.soundcloud.com/player.swf?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F70111266&secret_url=false[/flash]

Thanks for listening and look forward to hearing you thoughts on the piece.


Doug
 

rJames

Senior Member
I hope you didn't devolve into EIS... sounds like you are going backwards in your musical studies. I finally figured out you were delving into EIS. But devolve worked for me the first time through because I always saw EIS and a lower level of music. Not more base but more basic and illuminating of the structure above.

Anyway, cool. Is it real or is it Memorex? What parts are real instruments? I think you did a great job on the recording.

Overall (for me personally) I think it went on too long. If I'm going to listen to something for that long, I want it to explore something interesting. Which it did, kinda. I couldn't put my finger on a melody either. Its probably there but not short enough or contrasted enough for me to sing it. I guess that a little like the pot calling the kettle black because that is probably one of my biggest problems; setting the melody out for everyone to find.

Keep posting.

Ron
 
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DouglasGibsonComposer

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Hi Ron

Thank you for your comments, and for listening. I finally understand your first paragraph. Err.... Yes, my spelling was incorrect. I did mean delving.

Thanks again

Doug
 

Leandro Gardini

Senior Member
I think you did a great effort trying to impress us and you got it. This is a very nice piece with much more than the lesson asks for. Keep it up!!!
 

Craig Sharmat

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Very nice Douglass and thanks for posting keeping this section alive.

With a simple lesson you have displayed minor 9ths very well with scale (#11) and (#11,4+) . Considering you used few other textures outside of different instruments it kept my interest for a long time and of course the improv helped. I think it is a fine example how to keep things interesting while using limited harmonic variation. Looking forward to seeing what you post next.
 
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DouglasGibsonComposer

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I thought I would post a "real world" cue of mine as I felt EIS impacted my thinking. On the surface it sounds all blues/pentatonic based but I structured the whole harmonic development based on E4. I do not think I would have ever chosen those keys if not for my lessons.

Have a listen

[flash width=450 height=110 loop=false]http://player.soundcloud.com/player.swf?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F74213964&secret_url=false[/flash]

I may be starting a new thread with some questions I have been wondering about EIS and it's material. (for example how do you handle a mi7b5 if all the scales have only natural 5?)

Anyhow thanks for listening !
 

Johnny42

Member
Really good stuff. I really love the section from 1:30 until the end. Remember the rules for using #4(b5). You can use scale #3,6, and 11 for your mi7b5 chord.
 

Craig Sharmat

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fun stuff

also as you will find later in the course when you have a 3 note E3 structure and a root which might contain one of those notes you would lower the root in the treble. This is part of the diatonic method in BookV but till then just use as stated above a -3 scale and add a 4+ where allowed.
 

jsaras

Active Member
To expand a bit on what Craig said, the minor 7b5 chord does not appear in the course until the beginning of Book V, Tonal Harmony, where it's the vii chord in a major key. Spud apparently didn't like diminished triads, as well as 4-part diminished 7th chords and augmented triads, because those structures do not have a "root" per se.

In the case of a vii triad in a major key, the solution to the "no root" problem is to substitute the root that appears in the treble chord with the -7, which yields a mi7b5 chord (and not a vii diminished triad).

Interestingly, of the 27 total scales that are part of the course, the locrian mode and locrian #2 are not listed. I would guess that it may be due to the fact that early bebop jazz musicians like Dizzy Gillespie and Barry Harris contended that there was no such thing as a minor 7b5 chord and that it was really a minor 6 chord with the 6th in the bass. The implication is that the C ascending melodic minor scale (and/or the related locrian +2 mode) is the correct scale to be used on that set of intervals. Using that scale/mode to build minor 9b5 chords avoids the ultimate EIS sin; a -3 and -9 over a root.

Cheers
 

careyford

Active Member
Both of these area a lot of fun! Thanks for posting. Good groove in both is definitely a strength. Looking forward to hearing more.
 
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