Doom Eternal(and doom 2016)

Consona

Senior Member
hmmm, maybe they should be submitting their work for Bethesda, and maybe a kind soul will let them know that their purchase that they made twice was a poor choice and should just post threads here for the next opening.

fwiw, many of those classic film scores made the films, because the acting and dialog was pretty cringe. Nowadays we have better actors(or graphics and sound effects). I think the sonic character fits the atmosphere pretty spot on, and based on the reaction from the last 2 games, the music actually looks to be a massive driving factor in it's reception, as many user reviews mention the music and sound effects specifically. I can't think of the last FPS review where I saw people go out of their way to mention the music, side from really niche flavors like some of the farcry games.
Well, people these days are used to dumbed-down music. Especially the producers it seems, they even demand it in their products, ffs! :laugh: We're back in the circle of "MI Fallout is the best action music ever because it has huge braaaaaaaaams and cool synths and it's epiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiic". These praising reviews mean s#!t to me... Yea, I won't bother anybody with my rants again. :grin: Enjoy the soundtrack. :)
 

MrLinssi

A glorified bedroom musician.
these fvckn S L A P

I dont know how this existed for 4 years without me hearing it.

makes me want to dig out my genesis with the 32x and go ham

discuss.
Correction: Everything that Mick Gordon ( a.k.a. the God of Distortion and Weird Pedals) does fvckn
S L A P S.
 

Uiroo

Active Member
"You can be the ripest, juiciest peach in the world, and there's still going to be somebody who hates peaches. "


I love the sounddesign in the intro in both here. I dig the metal stuff, but I'm not that much into that anymore. I think it fits the game perfectly (although the gameplay looks a bit dull to be honest, but it's probably cool if you play it yourself ;))

edit: I mean Doom Eternal, Doom 2016 seemed better
 
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KEM

Senior Member
As someone who grew up only listening to metal their entire life and still only listens to metal I can tell you this is not generic in any regard, no metal band is doing stuff like this. There’s a reason these soundtracks are drooled over in the metal communities, they’re absolutely phenomenal and they deserve such praise, Mick Gordon managed to do something that almost no one else is doing nowadays, which is to make metal fresh and exciting.
 

x-dfo

Active Member
It's motif metal, the lastest game is a bit of a letdown compared to 2016 but it has its moments. I really am not a fan of the opening screen theme tho, it's like a bad take on Korn run through a bad limiter.
 

MrLinssi

A glorified bedroom musician.
As someone who grew up only listening to metal their entire life and still only listens to metal I can tell you this is not generic in any regard, no metal band is doing stuff like this. There’s a reason these soundtracks are drooled over in the metal communities, they’re absolutely phenomenal and they deserve such praise, Mick Gordon managed to do something that almost no one else is doing nowadays, which is to make metal fresh and exciting.
Exactly.
 

Uiroo

Active Member
I mean, if you're not into a specific genre, stuff tends to sound the same to you.
Like 10 years ago, I bought a Paramore album because I thought I should listen to some PopRock, but everything sounded the same to me, really dull.
One year later and I LOVED that album, every single song has its own thing. Great album.
 

Consona

Senior Member
As someone who grew up only listening to metal their entire life and still only listens to metal I can tell you this is not generic in any regard, no metal band is doing stuff like this. There’s a reason these soundtracks are drooled over in the metal communities, they’re absolutely phenomenal and they deserve such praise, Mick Gordon managed to do something that almost no one else is doing nowadays, which is to make metal fresh and exciting.
Could you explain to me why it's so good and revolutionary? I just can't hear it.

I mean, if you're not into a specific genre, stuff tends to sound the same to you.
Well, I've been listening to various kinds of metal for over 2 decades now and from that comparison, I don't hear anything special or exciting here.

The Kovenant made their In Times Before the Light heavy electro-industrial-metal remix 18 years ago. Limbonic Art released their brutal electro/atmospheric metal stuff over 20 years ago. Or how about DB's Puritanical Euphoric Misanthropia or Mayhem's Grand Declaration of War? Again 20 years ago. Every one of these albums was way more innovative and progressive, for metal, than what I hear in the Doom soundtrack. Plus all those albums had super catchy riffs and not just some generic palm-muting. Or Arcturus' avant-garde metal with a lot of various samples and electronic stuff in it that went far beyond the metal genre?!

How could I, knowing all that, be blown away by some plain repetitive low guitar chugging with some over-saturated electronic stuff? How can metal community think this is something so fresh and unspeakably phenomenal?* Stuff like this, way better than this, exists in metal more than 20 years ago.
(And do people still remember something like Pink Floyd, they used various loony sample techniques more than 50 years ago.)


*Well, I vividly remember all those "my speed metal is faster than your speed metal and your symphonic black metal is not as symphonic and dark as my symphonic black metal and this band is not black/thrash/kinda heavy metal, it's melodic/death/gothic metal!!!" debates. Such a deep and wide musical knowledge as in metal communities is really hard to find. Wouldn't be surprised adding a noisy synth pad would create a whole new genre in there.
:roflmao:

Or maybe I'm wrong and the metal community is a very sophisticated crowd now and the Doom soundtrack is so out-there revolutionary that I can't even get it. :laugh:
 

x-dfo

Active Member
also to note: bethesda responded to Gordon's VERY public complaints about the limiting of his music in the mix. They said he underdelivered/was late and they had to stretch what they received to fill the needs of the game.
 

MartinH.

Senior Member
Could you explain to me why it's so good and revolutionary? I just can't hear it.
I'd say "it goes brrrRRRZZZzzztt in a way that nothing else does".

Stuff like this, way better than this, exists in metal more than 20 years ago.
I don't think the innovation here is in what the guitars are doing and I'd agree that on that front we're not really hearing anything new. Also not conceptually in the broadest sense, metal and synths have been combined before. But all those examples that you gave don't even come close (for me personally) to scratching the same itch that the Doom Soundtrack satisfies. I wouldn't even put them in the same subgenre. If I had been trying to make your argument, I'd have named Sonic Mayhem, Celldweller, maybe Frank Klepacki. Or forget about the guitars entirely and check out Noisia's soundtrack for DMC:


I have been looking forever for a certain vibe of "energetic darkness" in music that the Doom OST satisfies so well. Before that I was seeking it in things like the ones mentioned above or Neurofunk like this:



When that Dimmu Borgir album that you mentioned came out I quite liked the song "Puritania" because it hit the right tone for me at least in some parts. So there I at least see where you're coming from with seeing the similarities.

over-saturated electronic stuff?
I guess if you can't appreciate the sounddesign aspect of it, then there's nothing for you to like here. Which is fine of course!

Just out of curiosity, how hard do you think making neurofunk is (without using loops), and have you ever tried making similar music?
 

asherpope

Member
Could you explain to me why it's so good and revolutionary? I just can't hear it.


Well, I've been listening to various kinds of metal for over 2 decades now and from that comparison, I don't hear anything special or exciting here.

The Kovenant made their In Times Before the Light heavy electro-industrial-metal remix 18 years ago. Limbonic Art released their brutal electro/atmospheric metal stuff over 20 years ago. Or how about DB's Puritanical Euphoric Misanthropia or Mayhem's Grand Declaration of War? Again 20 years ago. Every one of these albums was way more innovative and progressive, for metal, than what I hear in the Doom soundtrack. Plus all those albums had super catchy riffs and not just some generic palm-muting. Or Arcturus' avant-garde metal with a lot of various samples and electronic stuff in it that went far beyond the metal genre?!

How could I, knowing all that, be blown away by some plain repetitive low guitar chugging with some over-saturated electronic stuff? How can metal community think this is something so fresh and unspeakably phenomenal?* Stuff like this, way better than this, exists in metal more than 20 years ago.
(And do people still remember something like Pink Floyd, they used various loony sample techniques more than 50 years ago.)


*Well, I vividly remember all those "my speed metal is faster than your speed metal and your symphonic black metal is not as symphonic and dark as my symphonic black metal and this band is not black/thrash/kinda heavy metal, it's melodic/death/gothic metal!!!" debates. Such a deep and wide musical knowledge as in metal communities is really hard to find. Wouldn't be surprised adding a noisy synth pad would create a whole new genre in there.
:roflmao:

Or maybe I'm wrong and the metal community is a very sophisticated crowd now and the Doom soundtrack is so out-there revolutionary that I can't even get it. :laugh:
Maybe you're looking at it the wrong way - as a metal fan it might not sound that innovative or fresh to you, but for game music it sounds pretty damn innovative/risky to me (I say this an ignorant non gamer so what do I know really).


KEM said:


no metal band is doing stuff like this
And the fact some people referring this as "Slipknot" or whatever mainstream metal band they may have heard about tells more about them than Mick Gordon's magnificent score.

Yours, "another metalhead-78"

Also...a lot of the Doom riffs do sound quite a bit like Slipknot. And Rammstein. And a lot of the industrial sound design sounds like NIN. That's ok - it's fine to be influenced by mainstream stuff
 

zircon_st

Lead Developer
I love these soundtracks. As someone who listens to a LOT of metal, they're extremely innovative and fresh. It's not just "synths and guitars". HOW you use, mix, and process the guitars matters. This isn't SM57 + 5150 + Serum here. His sound design choices, EQ, compression, and tones are all super innovative and fit the games like a glove.

If you don't believe production matters, then a lot of music is going to sound samey to you. I think there is a world of difference - beyond the composition and performance - between say... Slayer, Dragonforce, Meshuggah, and In Flames. Totally different production sensibilities and you can instantly tell you're listening to a different band each time.
 

KEM

Senior Member
Maybe you're looking at it the wrong way - as a metal fan it might not sound that innovative or fresh to you, but for game music it sounds pretty damn innovative/risky to me (I say this an ignorant non gamer so what do I know really).



And the fact some people referring this as "Slipknot" or whatever mainstream metal band they may have heard about tells more about them than Mick Gordon's magnificent score.

Yours, "another metalhead-78"

Also...a lot of the Doom riffs do sound quite a bit like Slipknot. And Rammstein. And a lot of the industrial sound design sounds like NIN. That's ok - it's fine to be influenced by mainstream stuff
The riffs definitely feel like Slipknot, just on an 8 string, but the use of synths within that context is why I think it’s very new and refreshing, if people want to hate that’s fine, but to say there’s tons of other stuff out there like this, I don’t get it...
 

asherpope

Member
The riffs definitely feel like Slipknot, just on an 8 string, but the use of synths within that context is why I think it’s very new and refreshing, if people want to hate that’s fine, but to say there’s tons of other stuff out there like this, I don’t get it...
Yeah I'm not knocking it at all, I love the soundtrack and think Mick Gordon is a genius
 

x-dfo

Active Member
The riffs definitely feel like Slipknot, just on an 8 string, but the use of synths within that context is why I think it’s very new and refreshing, if people want to hate that’s fine, but to say there’s tons of other stuff out there like this, I don’t get it...
I think it's a generational difference. As someone who was a big gamer around quake/quake 2 and early consoles, pseudo industrial was really common, just before the rise of big beat being everywhere.
 

zircon_st

Lead Developer
Even the pure-synth tracks are REALLY cool. The sound design throughout this one is pure ear candy. Plus the processed vocals and the tonality that keeps shifting and wavering all over the place. Sounds morph into one another seamlessly and you can just feel this sense of dread building up.

Now keep in mind, in-game, you're not hearing this for 7 minutes straight with no breaks. It's in the context of exploring an area with growing and building tension, voiceover, SFX, and punctuated with ultra-intense combat. So, keep that in mind if you've never heard it.