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Does the music industry really need new music?

metalcat

New Member
Hi guys! I'm new here.
Recently I began to feel severe lack of motivation to doing music and trying to deal with it now. After few years of full time making royalty free music I decided to try to work with some trailer production libraries. Royalty free music is okay and it allowed me to earn enough for a living without other sources of income, but it will not last forever so I need to move on.

I started to learn about trailer music and industry, wrote tracks and send them and finally my last tracks are accepted to publishing. But here's the thing, I see new albums are releasing from big brands almost every week or even days, there are probably thousands composers and the number is getting bigger.

So, does really the world and the industry need new music? Is there still enough space to get into industry and try make a living from it when you are 30 y.o.? Isn't it too late to start from a scratch? Ofcourse, I know it depends on many factors and quality of my music (I think now it's average, but I'm learning and always try to improve), but still. From what I see, music is devaluing from day to day, and I think it will be harder and harder to compete and make money from it.

This really demotivates me, becouse I really love music and can't imagine my life doing something else. Am I wrong maybe and things aren't so depressing? I am not whining or something. I think I just need to see your opinions and thoughts about it. Thanks

Sorry for my english :unsure:
 
Last edited:

Rv5

Senior Member
Hi guys! I'm new here.
Recently I began to feel severe lack of motivation to doing music and trying to deal with it now. After few years of full time making royalty free music I decided to try to work with some trailer production libraries. Royalty free music is okay and it allowed me to earn enough for a living without other sources of income, but it will not last forever so I need to move on.

I started to learn about trailer music and industry, wrote tracks and send them and finally my last tracks are accepted to publishing. But here's the thing, I see new albums are releasing from big brands almost every week or even days, there are probably thousands composers and the number is getting bigger.

So, does really the world and the industry need new music? Is there still enough space to get into industry and try make a living from it when you are 30 y.o.? Isn't it too late to start from a scratch? Ofcourse, I know it depends on many factors and quality of my music (I think now it's average, but I'm learning and always try to improve), but still. From what I see, music is devaluing from day to day, and I think it will be harder and harder to compete and make money from it.

This really demotivates me, becouse I really love music and can't imagine my life doing something else. Am I wrong maybe and things aren't so depressing? I am not whining or something. I think I just need to see your opinions and thoughts about it. Thanks

Sorry for my english :unsure:
Hey metalcat - welcome to the forum!

Does the music industry need new music? Yeah, in terms of trailers it's always looking for the next thing, something 'fresh', 'different', 'daring', but something pretty much identical to what's already around because no one wants to get selling a $200 million product wrong. The trends ebb and flow, sometimes something completely left field might break the current trend for any given number of reasons, and set a new one.

It sounds like you are a creative person that needs to create, in which case I'd highly recommend you have a form of outlet that's completely removed from the 'industry'. Create for the sake of creating.

In terms of making a living and monetising your creative output, well there's a challenge. The industry is what it is, and you either work it or don't I suppose. There are lots of people doing things, ignore them bar what's useful to learn a few things here and there from, and set your goals. As you're aware it's dependent on many factors which means you have to be mindful of finding validation or being artistically valued depending on your success in an industry built on business. There's a difficult balance of creating (if you're a creative) and then sorting out your business game - networking, hustle, branding yourself, persistence etc. The traits of people successful in business tend to be different to traits found in creative people.

It's a competitive field and also one where it's good to know the right people, get lucky at the right time etc. With library music there's a sense of intangible return, so it's tough.

Being demotivated is really normal and understandable, keep working hard, be mindful of where you're looking for validation, try and creative for yourself purely for the act of creating/expressing yourself, keep an eye on the industry and learn what you can to put yourself in the best position. If needs be find a supportive/part time source of income possibly completely unrelated to music, keep things as balanced as possible.

A few rambling thoughts!
Good luck!
 

synkrotron

A creator of Stuff
Create for the sake of creating
Kinda what I was trying to say

One thing that has never demotivated me has been the thought of not earning a crust from my "hobby."

I have been demotivated, but due to other things.

I would recommend that @metalcat takes some time out to watch some of Christian Henson's vlog on YouTube. Very depressing if you thinking of making it in the world of "monetising your creative output." But essential viewing, in my opinion.



cheers

andy
 

jneebz

Senior Member
Hey metalcat - welcome to the forum!

Does the music industry need new music? Yeah, in terms of trailers it's always looking for the next thing, something 'fresh', 'different', 'daring', but something pretty much identical to what's already around because no one wants to get selling a $200 million product wrong. The trends ebb and flow, sometimes something completely left field might break the current trend for any given number of reasons, and set a new one.

It sounds like you are a creative person that needs to create, in which case I'd highly recommend you have a form of outlet that's completely removed from the 'industry'. Create for the sake of creating.

In terms of making a living and monetising your creative output, well there's a challenge. The industry is what it is, and you either work it or don't I suppose. There are lots of people doing things, ignore them bar what's useful to learn a few things here and there from, and set your goals. As you're aware it's dependent on many factors which means you have to be mindful of finding validation or being artistically valued depending on your success in an industry built on business. There's a difficult balance of creating (if you're a creative) and then sorting out your business game - networking, hustle, branding yourself, persistence etc. The traits of people successful in business tend to be different to traits found in creative people.

It's a competitive field and also one where it's good to know the right people, get lucky at the right time etc. With library music there's a sense of intangible return, so it's tough.

Being demotivated is really normal and understandable, keep working hard, be mindful of where you're looking for validation, try and creative for yourself purely for the act of creating/expressing yourself, keep an eye on the industry and learn what you can to put yourself in the best position. If needs be find a supportive/part time source of income possibly completely unrelated to music, keep things as balanced as possible.

A few rambling thoughts!
Good luck!
Thanks for this.
 

Akarin

pragsound.com
I think the same question can be asked in many different industries. I used to be a programmer, making apps and such. Yet, with millions of apps on the App Store, is it worth it? It is more a question of persistence and marketing yourself, I think. Of course, writing awesome music helps as well :-D
 
OP
M

metalcat

New Member
Thank you all for replies!

You could treat music creation as a hobby, perhaps.
I think this is a good way, and I always tried to avoid thinking of music as of job, which you just have to do. I understand that music is not the place where you can make decent money (when you are not well known producer or composer). I am doing it just because I am loving it, so I think this is a hobby for me, which fortunately allows me to earn enough for a living for now. But when I getting older, thoughts of what to do next and how can I make my living consistent are inevitable. If I can't earn from music I simply can't give it so much time as I do now.

Hey metalcat - welcome to the forum!

Does the music industry need new music? Yeah, in terms of trailers it's always looking for the next thing, something 'fresh', 'different', 'daring', but something pretty much identical to what's already around because no one wants to get selling a $200 million product wrong. The trends ebb and flow, sometimes something completely left field might break the current trend for any given number of reasons, and set a new one.

It sounds like you are a creative person that needs to create, in which case I'd highly recommend you have a form of outlet that's completely removed from the 'industry'. Create for the sake of creating.

In terms of making a living and monetising your creative output, well there's a challenge. The industry is what it is, and you either work it or don't I suppose. There are lots of people doing things, ignore them bar what's useful to learn a few things here and there from, and set your goals. As you're aware it's dependent on many factors which means you have to be mindful of finding validation or being artistically valued depending on your success in an industry built on business. There's a difficult balance of creating (if you're a creative) and then sorting out your business game - networking, hustle, branding yourself, persistence etc. The traits of people successful in business tend to be different to traits found in creative people.

It's a competitive field and also one where it's good to know the right people, get lucky at the right time etc. With library music there's a sense of intangible return, so it's tough.

Being demotivated is really normal and understandable, keep working hard, be mindful of where you're looking for validation, try and creative for yourself purely for the act of creating/expressing yourself, keep an eye on the industry and learn what you can to put yourself in the best position. If needs be find a supportive/part time source of income possibly completely unrelated to music, keep things as balanced as possible.

A few rambling thoughts!
Good luck!
Thank you, these are interesting thoughts.
 

ism

Senior Member
There’s something fundamental to the human experience of the search for “how newness enters the world”. I’m quite partial to the French Philosopher Alan Badiou, myself, who argues that philosophy itself doesn’t create truth but merely organizes the 4 Truth producing discourses of Science, Love, Art, and Politics.

Even if 100% of new music was genuinely bad and derivative, rather than merely lament ‘there’s nothing new under the sun’ (to quote the ancient Hebrew philosopher’s lament) it would still be necessary search for the event that ruptures the status quo.

You can see a simple, but quietly profound I think, example of this is Steven Spielberg's (not particularly good) film ‘ I wanna hold your hand”. On the day of the Beatles first appearance on the Ed Sullivan show, 4 teens break into the hotel where the Beatles are staying. Predictable hijinks ensure. At one point the police call the fiancé of one of the girls to escort her home. In the car, in his well meaning but tedious and condescending pontifications, he lectures her on aberrant behavior of sneaking in to see the Beatles, and enthusiasts about their future life together in the suburbs and his excitement of plans for his life in selling plastic furniture covers.

She doesn’t have the language to express everything that she find oppressive about this. All she can say, after an agonized silence, is “I want more ..”. “Like what?”, he challengers her, incredulously. “Like the Beatles”, she says unable to express this feeling of rupture and newness entering the world in any other way. And jump out of the car, heading back to the Ed Sullivan Theatre.

Can’t comment of the career implications of this though, unfortunately.
 

halfwalk

Active Member
So this is probably a sort of departure from the topic of the industry itself, as there are many awesome people here who have far more valuable insight into that than I could ever offer. But this is something of which I have to remind myself when I start to feel discouraged about drowning in the sea of noise. I think it's important to consider more than just the financial aspect, especially in a world (at least the one where I grew up) where we implore our young creatives to "get a real job" or "don't quit your day job" or something else to that effect.


Does the world need more:

cars? babies? weapons? microbreweries? meatless burgers? youtube channels? vst plugins? factories? oil wells? insurance companies? quick service restaurants? forum posts? sparkling water flavors? smartphone iterations?

etc

Probably not. But these numbers are getting bigger every day. And people keep buying into them. I think we are in a confusing time for humanity, where for many of us, it's not about "needing something" so much as "wanting to do" something.

The world needs more creative people. Creativity is how we survived, how we evolved, how we've found purpose in life. Before literacy became widespread, music/rhythm/poetry was how culture and history were passed down from one generation to the next. It's how we learned to take seemingly random vibrations in the world and convert them into feelings, images, messages, stories, truths, wonders. It is a form of communication that can transcend language barriers and other cultural differences.

What blows my mind about music the most: music doesn't actually "exist" in the world; it is just moving air. Like language itself, the whole concept of music occurs in our heads; it is our collective imagination's response to the air bouncing around. Your brain senses these vibrations, finds the patterns, makes sense of the space and the air within it, and music occurs.

It's almost magical, in a sense. And the world needs more magic, before we forget magic was ever even a thing at all.

The world needs your music.

But sometimes, it might be your responsibility as a magician to remind them of the importance of that magic. How? Don't stop creating.

Anyway, sorry for this rambling digression. Put me on ignore and let the actual helpful adults take the mic.
 
OP
M

metalcat

New Member
So this is probably a sort of departure from the topic of the industry itself, as there are many awesome people here who have far more valuable insight into that than I could ever offer. But this is something of which I have to remind myself when I start to feel discouraged about drowning in the sea of noise. I think it's important to consider more than just the financial aspect, especially in a world (at least the one where I grew up) where we implore our young creatives to "get a real job" or "don't quit your day job" or something else to that effect.


Does the world need more:

cars? babies? weapons? microbreweries? meatless burgers? youtube channels? vst plugins? factories? oil wells? insurance companies? quick service restaurants? forum posts? sparkling water flavors? smartphone iterations?

etc

Probably not. But these numbers are getting bigger every day. And people keep buying into them. I think we are in a confusing time for humanity, where for many of us, it's not about "needing something" so much as "wanting to do" something.

The world needs more creative people. Creativity is how we survived, how we evolved, how we've found purpose in life. Before literacy became widespread, music/rhythm/poetry was how culture and history were passed down from one generation to the next. It's how we learned to take seemingly random vibrations in the world and convert them into feelings, images, messages, stories, truths, wonders. It is a form of communication that can transcend language barriers and other cultural differences.

What blows my mind about music the most: music doesn't actually "exist" in the world; it is just moving air. Like language itself, the whole concept of music occurs in our heads; it is our collective imagination's response to the air bouncing around. Your brain senses these vibrations, finds the patterns, makes sense of the space and the air within it, and music occurs.

It's almost magical, in a sense. And the world needs more magic, before we forget magic was ever even a thing at all.

The world needs your music.

But sometimes, it might be your responsibility as a magician to remind them of the importance of that magic. How? Don't stop creating.

Anyway, sorry for this rambling digression. Put me on ignore and let the actual helpful adults take the mic.
This is really inspiring. Thank you!

Does the world need more:

meatless burgers?
Definitely yes for me, haha. Can't find any in my town
 

GtrString

Active Member
It's like asking does the music industry need more of the language of music.. doesn't really make sense.

Yes, the music industry exploits works made in the language of music.
Yes, music is a foundation of their existence.
No, they should not be getting more music.
Yes, like the written word, music will exist as long as man.
No, there is no need for a music "industry".
 
OP
M

metalcat

New Member
I think it really helps to just get out and perform with other musicians. Don't become divorced from making music with fellow professionals. Don't lock yourself away in a studio.
Last time I played guitar with real people in a band was probably 5 years ago... Almost forgot how it is :) Maybe should give it a try, thanks
 
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