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Do you have any idea what the following notations mean?

JohnG

Senior Member
And NO KEY SIGNATURES!
Ah -- a vast topic!

Outside of Los Angeles I have found most of them prefer a key signature. In London, they can play anything you throw at them.

But each experience is somewhat idiosyncratic, of course. We only really know the gigs we were involved on personally.

If you're recording in Tokyo, be sure you use key signatures if you're using local copyists.
 

Dave Connor

Senior Member
Ah -- a vast topic!

Outside of Los Angeles I have found most of them prefer a key signature. In London, they can play anything you throw at them.

But each experience is somewhat idiosyncratic, of course. We only really know the gigs we were involved on personally.

If you're recording in Tokyo, be sure you use key signatures if you're using local copyists.
I’ve been delivering audio files for so long that when I do occasional copy work I often forget this one. An old understandable habit and I’m not surprised if it’s an LA film thing and rare in other locals. For heaven’s sake people, what key are we in here!?!?
 

Daryl

Senior Member
Are you agree with this:
Yes, this is obviously a film score ('cos of the ridiculous large time sigs), and in that circumstance, "cue" means something that may or may not be wanted. The decsion will be made during the recording session.
 
I have been an orchestrator for a number of large feature films, as well as many other contexts.

I have used the 'Cue" with extra staves many times.

99% of the cues I have done are for strings. It's not about "hearing" the score as so much is placed on the "mock-up" these days. Often as an orchestrator, I am waiting for cues to get approved, so it means a large group of people has heard and signed off on its approval.

The main reason I have done "Cues" is for "Studio magic". By recording those parts on their own (no other instruments; often called "Stripe-ing" Not striping btw) the mixer will have the flexibility to add instrumental color at a volume and clarity that is simply impossible otherwise.

Artificial harmonics are common, or other techniques like col legno where the players don't want to harm their instruments. Thus they can be recorded at really soft volume levels and turned up.
Additionally, so they do not blur/get drowned out with the other textures.

I have felt over the years I am getting much better at telling when cues are recording. John Powell seems to use this device a lot.

Anyway, as long as you don't do too many cues, you can organize the session the cue is done right before a break and the other orchestral players leave. Or, if needed (extra $ of course) the section of players stay after to do the cues.

Finally, it lets players focus on one part vs playing thru life and have to switch from ord arco to some extended technique.

I was not personally there for the following example but listening to it is exactly the kind of situation I have had to use the "Cue". The giveaway is later around the 1:30 mark. It's just too clean and sticking out for the type of extended technique being used. So most likely there is just 2 staves with all those harmonics that they would record on their own and label "cue"

 
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