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Cubase vs logic... is hans zimmer right?

ProfoundSilence

Senior Member
I cannot actually believe HZ actually said that.

had to be someone ghost writing his forum posts or something - it's such a crazy statement... I'm sure that different factors(everything from key controller to libraries, to workflow) would have an effect on HOW you write. Working with midi in Cubase versus Logic might absolutely change how you write/program/sculpt midi data - but all things equal, there isn't a shadow of a chance in hell he'd be able to tell which track is Cubase and logic. Could there be differences? I suppose that's entirely possible... By way of summing order - and dithering, and possibly incorrect delay compensation on reverbs(I've never used logic so I have no idea)

But if he(or anyone) had ears THAT sensitive, they would be able to explain precisely what is different, rather than "pfffft logic suxxxx"
 

dzilizzi

I just hang around pretending I know something
I think I read about 20 pages of this over on Gearslutz. I think the conclusion was the only one that is slightly different is Harrison Mixbus because it is based off the sound of the 32c console and has color in the DAW. Other wise they all nulled out. And they tested a lot of DAWs.

And ProTools sounds better than all of them.....;)
 

Floris

New Member
Better music sounds better.

DAWs differ mostly in workflow - they don't really make you a better composer. These threads about extremely small differences, and the question if they exist at all or not, are all a bit useless to me.
Use a DAW that you love, and don't hold onto artificial constructs that one DAW is 'better' or 'brighter'.
These things are usually always in-between your ears, something simply a bit louder can sound like it has more depth and a grander sound while it may be the exact same audio file.

Use a DAW you're comfortable with, learn more about composing to make your tracks better, learn more about mixing to make your track brighter. That's what really matters in my opinion.
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
if someone makes a general claim that such and such DAW sounds brighter. That is a fallacious statement. If someone makes a statement that such and such DAW might sound brighter because of the way people tend to use it...that may not be fallacious, but its ultimately still the user choosing to make things sound brighter by the way they are using it.
 
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MarcelM

MarcelM

Senior Member
if someone makes a general claim that such and such DAW sounds brighter. That is a fallacious statement. If someone makes a statement that such and such DAW might sound brighter because of the way people tend to use it...that may not be fallacious, but its ultimately still the user choosing to make things sound brighter by the way they are using it.
so can you explain the video on page one and all the comments about it?
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
are you kidding me? I could barely stand to watch that video it was a waste of 20 minutes of my life. All the comments that one DAW sounds better then another are first all entirely subjective, and second of all based on superstition and unreliable human senses.
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
nobody said they are "equal". They all have some pros and cons. The automation peculilarities between them are documented various places. That is something that can and should be discussed. To make a blanket statement that one just sounds better then the other is malarky. To call one "brighter" then another is malarky. To say one has more headroom then another is malarky.

The automation nuances would be make for a worthwhile discussion...but have nothing to do with the claim put forth in the first post of this thread.
 

Jeremy Gillam

Active Member
...for your “Null Test”, how many complex tracks did you use? My suspicion is that it’s mixing and summing - and pushing the DAW engine really hard - creates differences in sound. And surely you want to have the possibility of complex tracks?
From what I understand, Pro Tools HD in the TDM days used a 48-bit fixed point summing engine that could be "pushed" — with high track counts (?) or by turning the levels up to create some distortion in the mix bus that was pleasing to some ears. But with pretty much all DAWs including Pro Tools HDX using 32 or 64-bit floating point summing I don't think this still applies.

I'm happy to be proven wrong!
 

marclawsonmusic

Senior Member
All DAWs are not equal.
When Logic or Studio One are not able to perform one simple automation (Fade) on a Sinus signal without Intermodulation, but most of the other DAWs succeed, I think it's normal for some of us to hear the difference between 2 DAWs on some complex project.
Try yourself https://www.admiralbumblebee.com/music/2019/03/10/Daw-V-Daw-Automation.html

Edit : It's objective and reliable
I find this fascinating. I will ask the practical question...

Can you hear these differences audibly? My ears are not as sensitive as some - e.g. one of my sons has perfect pitch and even minor intonation problems are like fingernails on chalkboard to him...

I like science and empirical data too, but if we can’t hear it, who gives a damn if it shows on some scope? On the other hand, if better ears than mine are hearing differences, I will take it seriously.

PS - This isn’t another 432hz discussion is it?
 

Vik

Scandi Member
I think I read about 20 pages of this over on Gearslutz. I think the conclusion was the only one that is slightly different is Harrison Mixbus because it is based off the sound of the 32c console and has color in the DAW. Other wise they all nulled out. And they tested a lot of DAWs.
Logic doesn't even sound equal to Logic. :) Before version 10.3, Logic didn't have 64-bit summing.
 

StefanoM

Senior Sound Designer & Composer
I wonder what "pushing the daw engin really hard" means?

The code is not always the same. And is not always write well. For example, an emulation of a 1176 can sound Good or not. Some emulation sounds very good if are a push to the "limit" like the real hardware, in this situations, other emulation sounds like a toy. So I think that it's similar to the audio engine.
 
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jamwerks

Senior Member
The Code is not always the same. And is not always write well. For example, an Emulation of a 1176 can sound Good or not. Some Emulation sounds very good if are a push to the "limit" like the real hardware, in this situations, other emulation sounds like a toy. So I think that it's similar to the Audio engine.
The audio engin that Hans speaks of is just addition. If there are compressors in the chain that he's "hitting hard" that's a different story, and doesn't have anything to do with the daw.
 
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