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Compositions on Staffpad.

MadLad

Member
A trio for Violin, Cello and Piano, based on a rather famous renaissance theme. The piano is from the default library, the strings are Berlin strings. Unfortunately it's very hard for me to get the balance between piano and strings right. The three movements are actually over 7 years old but with the new library it sounds so much closer to what I actually imagined the piece to sound like.

Youtube Playlist:
Belle qui tiens ma vie for Trio
 

MadLad

Member
After almost a year, I was finally able to write something new. A short piece, not very original but at least it's something to get me out of writer's block.

It was done with Orchestra Tools and CinePerc. I'm still trying to figure out the balance and good mixing but the libraries at least sound already awesome out of the box (and my best discovery was that Berlin Strings has non vibrato samples which really help when you want to write a strings melody with very distinct articulation).
 

jonathanparham

Senior Member
After almost a year, I was finally able to write something new. A short piece, not very original but at least it's something to get me out of writer's block.

It was done with Orchestra Tools and CinePerc. I'm still trying to figure out the balance and good mixing but the libraries at least sound already awesome out of the box (and my best discovery was that Berlin Strings has non vibrato samples which really help when you want to write a strings melody with very distinct articulation).
I like the break 1:30 and it's the resolution at 1:46
 

Mike T

Atmospheric Member
I'm a "notes guy" who is cripplingly picky about realistic sound. So while some of the demos here make me think StaffPad has more potential in this regard than other notation software, I'm not sure I'd be willing to write off a properly crafted DAW performance just yet.

I was initially very intrigued by this, but cooled off once I realized my expectations were a bit beyond what was actually happening. I'll just have to give it a try.
 

ed buller

Senior Member
If you're a "notes" guy, there's nothing like it. Despite all of the DAW libraries I own (way too many), I can't make them sound as good as StaffPad.
really ?...that does surprise me. I own both and have a fortune invested on my drives from sample libraries and as much as I love staffpad I can get a lot closer on Cubase


best

ed
 

ed buller

Senior Member
I was initially very intrigued by this, but cooled off once I realized my expectations were a bit beyond what was actually happening. I'll just have to give it a try.
It's really a wonderful tool. But yes i'd have to agree the control in a DAW is superior

best

ed
 

brandowalk

Composer
Control is one thing, but writing the best musical parts that you can is even more important in my view.

I am just finishing up a re-orchestration of a piece I produced a few years ago straight into a DAW. It was a good piece, and I liked the audio output from the DAW. In StaffPad, I am redoing the string lines and counterpoint, preparing parts for performance. These new updated parts I could have never have imagined playing straight into a DAW. The piece is much more musical now, and the output sounds better than what I produced in the DAW.

For me, it is much easier to write (and re-write) the individual parts from a musician's view when using StaffPad, vs playing directly into the DAW. I think this is part of what makes things seem more musical.

Once you have the music written, there is still quite a bit you can do, exporting from StaffPad to a DAW for further processing and refining levels if you want that extra 10-20% of quality.

I suppose you could achieve the same with pencil/paper, then entering into your DAW if that is your preferred workflow. StaffPad isn't for everyone, but it has been tremendous for me.

Brandon
musicbybrandonwalker.com
 
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