CineSamples' CinePiano

re-peat

Senior Member
Actually it's a switch to enable the fff layer. You don't ever have to turn it on.
It's turned on by default, Fist.
And if it was intended mainly for powerful bass ostinati and such, that's particularly strange as most of those fff bass notes sound more like a harpsichord-on-steroïds instead of a roaring grand piano.

But again: below fff, CinePiano can be very seductive.

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Chris, you're right, there is no half-pedaling.

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muadgil

Member
While we are digging into Cinepiano features, do you know if there is a way to inverse the stereo image? By default highs are on the left and lows on the right. I'm used to the opposite, like when I play on a real piano.
By the way, I'm fully satisfied with the sonority of this piano, very warm and full indeed, with fff disabled. But that kind of extreme piano sound, I never use...
 

re-peat

Senior Member
Muadgil,

In Kontakt, click the wrench (top left button) and insert an 'Inverter' (Instrument InsertFX > Utilities > Inverter) into the empty InsertEffects slot (second one from the right, between the 'SGEQ' and the 'Sends' slots) and enable L/R Swap.

Simpler still (or the only solution if you're using CinePiano in KontaktPlayer): in your DAW, insert a plugin after Kontakt that does L/R swapping. In Logic, for example, the Gain plugin has an L/R swap button. I'm sure other DAWS also have a plugin with which to achieve the same thing.

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SupremeFist

Senior Member
It's turned on by default, Fist.
It's enabled in two out of the four patches and disabled in the other two, so I guess that's a draw.

And if it was intended mainly for powerful bass ostinati and such, that's particularly strange as most of those fff bass notes sound more like a harpsichord-on-steroïds instead of a roaring grand piano.
Just relaying what the dev said in a video, sorry if it doesn't help.

But again: below fff, CinePiano can be very seductive.
So why don't you just use it without the fff layer enabled?
 

re-peat

Senior Member
I guess I’ll have to. But I happen to be the kind of piano player who, when appropriate, likes to visit and exploit the dynamic extremes of the instrument, so the absence of fff will be a lingering disappointment.

And I remain of the opinion that it’s a bit of a pity that they didn’t make this fff layer a bona fide fortissimo piano layer that’s integral to the instrument’s expressive abilities. Would have expanded the musical powers of CinePiano considerably. In deciding not to do so, they lowered the ceiling of the instrument’s timbral range. Why? And instead, there’s this almost grotesque, very uneven and inconsistent sounding “ultra fff” layer which, for most of the notes, not only sounds very disconnected from the other dynamics layers, but also has, due to its unevenness, very little use on its own in the context of convincing piano emulation.

I just don’t get the thinking behind the decision, that’s all.

And the reason I might seem disproportionately frustrated about this, is because, amidst the unpleasant harpsichordish noises, that fff layer also contains a handful of excellent fff samples. (A rare thing in sampled pianos.) It’s those samples that make me think: if only the entire fff layer had samples of that quality and character, this would have a been an outstanding sampled Steinway.

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muadgil

Member
Muadgil,

In Kontakt, click the wrench (top left button) and insert an 'Inverter' (Instrument InsertFX > Utilities > Inverter) into the empty InsertEffects slot (second one from the right, between the 'SGEQ' and the 'Sends' slots) and enable L/R Swap.

Simpler still (or the only solution if you're using CinePiano in KontaktPlayer): in your DAW, insert a plugin after Kontakt that does L/R swapping. In Logic, for example, the Gain plugin has an L/R swap button. I'm sure other DAWS also have a plugin with which to achieve the same thing.

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Perfect solutions! Thanks lot for this
(I really need to improve my logic/kontakt skills...)
 

SupremeFist

Senior Member
I guess I’ll have to. But I happen to be the kind of piano player who, when appropriate, likes to visit and exploit the dynamic extremes of the instrument, so the absence of fff will be a lingering disappointment.

And I remain of the opinion that it’s a bit of a pity that they didn’t make this fff layer a bona fide fortissimo piano layer that’s integral to the instrument’s expressive abilities. Would have expanded the musical powers of CinePiano considerably. In deciding not to do so, they lowered the ceiling of the instrument’s timbral range. Why? And instead, there’s this almost grotesque, very uneven and inconsistent sounding “ultra fff” layer which, for most of the notes, not only sounds very disconnected from the other dynamics layers, but also has, due to its unevenness, very little use on its own in the context of convincing piano emulation.

I just don’t get the thinking behind the decision, that’s all.

And the reason I might seem disproportionately frustrated about this, is because, amidst the unpleasant harpsichordish noises, that fff layer also contains a handful of excellent fff samples. (A rare thing in sampled pianos.) It’s those samples that make me think: if only the entire fff layer had samples of that quality and character, this would have a been an outstanding sampled Steinway.

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Would it help to think of the fff layer as an ffff layer so you don't miss it? ;) I mean, if you look at the explanation of how they sampled it, it's not a sound you could ever get out of the piano by playing normally… I personally don't find the top velocity of the regular sound without the extra layer to be feeble in any way.