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Chatting with: Anne-Kathrin Dern! (Film composer, songwriter, orchestrator, mockup artist)

ChrisSiuMusic

Senior Member
Hey friends! In today's interview, I have the pleasure of chatting with Anne-Kathrin Dern! In case you're unaware, she recently brought me on to work on a film with her, which was definitely a great learning experience and one that I'll remember for a long time. Please enjoy our chat!

0:00 Intro and background
5:04 Is 'overnight success' real?
7:18 What would you recommend to upcoming composers for a career in the industry?
11:06 How did the pandemic affect you?
14:32 How much does location matter?
19:25 The importance of being online nowadays?
24:15 What's the biggest lesson you've learned in your career so far?
28:44 Working even when you don't feel like it
31:09 Being consistent

 

Double Helix

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Enlightening, Chris--thanks for posting
It occurs to me that much of her narrative could apply not only to composing, but to life in general (staying current, being a team player, being patient, being persistent, &c). A-KD comes across as being (and becoming) a pretty together person, in and out of music.
 
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ChrisSiuMusic

ChrisSiuMusic

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Enlightening, Chris--thanks for posting
It occurs to me that much of her narrative could apply not only to composing, but to life in general (staying current, being a team player, being patient, being persistent, &c). A-KD comes across as being (and becoming) a pretty together person, in and out of music.
My absolute pleasure! I agree, lots of advice in the industry can thankfully apply to other areas in life as well.
 

b_elliott

A work in progress.
Hey friends! In today's interview, I have the pleasure of chatting with Anne-Kathrin Dern! In case you're unaware, she recently brought me on to work on a film with her, which was definitely a great learning experience and one that I'll remember for a long time. Please enjoy our chat!
Fascinating interview between two individuals I admire.

Though I am retired, I was interested in the job conditions AK described (i.e., 200 applications sent - 2 month hire-wash-rinse-repeat.) I had the luxury of a unionized job, but only a few years back read of upper management's hiring strategy to move towards 4-month contracts (higher pay, no health benefits) then repeating the hiring process every 4 months. Yikes, that would = stress! Yet, there it is.

Hats off to those working under those conditions.

AK cracked me up on Mozart having the odd "turd" symphony if I heard her correctly. A viewpoint shared by one of Canada's giants: Glen Gould.* I first ran across the Gould interview last year--at first I was 'wtf?'...; however, I realized I am concentrated on Mozart's gems: his operas and string quartets.

Thanks for posting this Chris and best of luck to both of you down the road. Maybe more film projects together...who knows? Cheers,
Bill

* Be warned, it's Glen's 20-minute Wolf-ey smack-down followed up lovingly with K333.
 
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BVMusic

Member
Well done @ChrisSiuMusic for the organized interview with Anne.
Very interesting to hear Anne-Kathrin's journey.

Some of my reflections:
Regarding making music and putting it out there, my view is to not bother with likes and views so much after you release your music out there, as this can hinder you. Even if just one person writes to you positively about it, then you made it. But even then, even if this does not happen, which I doubt in the long run, does not mean the music is not good. Because you never know and then if you know that it is good, that is enough, as long as you take your music production seriously, with passion, however.

I like to make music like a soundtrack for myself first and then share it.
Also one could always continue to make music and releasing it if you do not find a job in film composing. Just do not get negative about what you are doing. If you are sure you made your best in your track and or you wish to inspire other persons with it, then there is your aim!
Best - Brian
 
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ChrisSiuMusic

ChrisSiuMusic

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Fascinating interview between two individuals I admire.

Though I am retired, I was interested in the job conditions AK described (i.e., 200 applications sent - 2 month hire-wash-rinse-repeat.) I had the luxury of a unionized job, but only a few years back read of upper management's hiring strategy to move towards 4-month contracts (higher pay, no health benefits) then repeating the hiring process every 4 months. Yikes, that would = stress! Yet, there it is.

Hats off to those working under those conditions.

AK cracked me up on Mozart having the odd "turd" symphony if I heard her correctly. A viewpoint shared by one of Canada's giants: Glen Gould.* I first ran across the Gould interview last year--at first I was 'wtf?'...; however, I realized I am concentrated on Mozart's gems: his operas and string quartets.

Thanks for posting this Chris and best of luck to both of you down the road. Maybe more film projects together...who knows? Cheers,
Bill

* Be warned, it's Glen's 20-minute Wolf-ey smack-down followed up lovingly with K333.
Thanks for sharing your story!!
 
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ChrisSiuMusic

ChrisSiuMusic

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Well done @ChrisSiuMusic for the organized interview with Anne.
Very interesting to hear Anne-Kathrin's journey.

Some of my reflections:
Regarding making music and putting it out there, my view is to not bother with likes and views so much after you release your music out there, as this can hinder you. Even if just one person writes to you positively about it, then you made it. But even then, even if this does not happen, which I doubt in the long run, does not mean the music is not good. Because you never know and then if you know that it is good, that is enough, as long as you take your music production seriously, with passion, however.

I like to make music like a soundtrack for myself first and then share it.
Also one could always continue to make music and releasing it if you do not find a job in film composing. Just do not get negative about what you are doing. If you are sure you made your best in your track and or you wish to inspire other persons with it, then there is your aim!
Best - Brian
Love your takes on releasing music and influencing people later in life. As someone who just released their album, it hasn't reached thousands, but the people who it has touched makes it all worth it. Thanks for sharing.
 
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