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Can someone explain to me why Spitfire's Studio Orchestra doesn't include percussion?

erica-grace

Senior Member
Someone, please?

They did this once before. And now they do it again.

The Spitfire Studio Orchestra Is Complete

Well, no it's not. How can you call it complete when you have 3/4 of the orchestra?

I am not trying to be negative here, I just want to understand. Can someone explain this?
 

Land of Missing Parts

flibbertigibbet
I think people tend to buy strings, brass, and woodwinds over and over, and they buy orchestra percussion once.

I know some folks use the Bernard Herrmann Composer Toolkit to fill in the percussion, as I believe it is recorded in the same space.

BTW, how crazy is it that at this moment in time you can buy the Spitfire Studio Orchestra and Cineperc for under $1,000? What a time for someone who is getting a fresh start!
 
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jbuhler

Senior Member
Someone, please?

They did this once before. And now they do it again.

The Spitfire Studio Orchestra Is Complete

Well, no it's not. How can you call it complete when you have 3/4 of the orchestra?

I am not trying to be negative here, I just want to understand. Can someone explain this?
It accords with the way I was trained (in the 1980s). Timpani is core to the orchestra, as is to some extent harp, and it is a bit surprising how those are often left out of orchestral sample collections today (but not as surprising as libraries presenting themselves as complete but without any woodwinds). But the other percussion (even the snare, bass drum, cymbals, gong, glock, etc., which are closer to core), piano, celeste, choir, etc., were presented more as supplements to the core orchestral instruments of the "standard" (usually winds a3, 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba) symphony orchestra.
 

MaxOctane

Active Member
If it's not Bolero, the snare drum should stay in the back room.

Timpani, and to a lesser degree harp, are must-haves though.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
If it's not Bolero, the snare drum should stay in the back room.
Yes, this was more or less the attitude that was conveyed to me as well. It was actually the attitude toward most of the percussion except timpani: overly colorful distractions from the "real" music.
 

thereus

Active Member
Yes, this was more or less the attitude that was conveyed to me as well. It was actually the attitude toward most of the percussion except timpani: overly colorful distractions from the "real" music.
I sang in a performance of The Dream Of Gerontius. Without the percussion during the God moment, it wouldn't make a lot of sense.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
I sang in a performance of The Dream Of Gerontius. Without the percussion during the God moment, it wouldn't make a lot of sense.
I wouldn't disagree with you. I'm just conveying the attitude taught, not that I agree with it. (Hence real in quotes.)
 

Geoff Grace

Senior Member
Percussion is either indispensable or not, depending on the music you're composing. Bartók's Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta would sound odd without percussion, for example.

Best,

Geoff
 

Mason

Active Member
Yes, I can explain.

The Spitfire Studio Orchestra is the name of a collection of orchestral libraries by Spitfire Audio.

What they have said is that this collection is now completed. They have never said this is a complete orchestra?
 

kevthurman

Active Member
Percussion samples are a saturated market. It's not like they can really do anything groundbreaking with percussion anymore. It's not the same as strings, winds, and brass, which are all constantly getting better and each new library that gets released by anybody is bringing some huge technical advantage.
 

Floris

New Member
Just want to mention that their symphonic range collection also doesn't include percussion: they have a 'complete' version with separate percussion, harp and piano: but they weren't officially part of the symphonic range.
Perhaps if this turns out well they might consider continuing on with percussion, solo strings.
 
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erica-grace

Senior Member
What they have said is that this collection is now completed. They have never said this is a complete orchestra?
The did NOT say that this collection is now completed.

What they said is The Spitfire Studio Orchestra Is Complete

Which is them saying that this is a complete orchestra
 

thereus

Active Member
Yes, I can explain.

The Spitfire Studio Orchestra is the name of a collection of orchestral libraries by Spitfire Audio.

What they have said is that this collection is now completed. They have never said this is a complete orchestra?
Er.... I think the OP already knew that. He wants to know why they don’t have a complete orchestra in the completed collection called Spitfire Studio Orchestra...
 

kevthurman

Active Member
EVERYTHING is a saturated market.
Yeah, but the major brass/woodwind/string libraries tend to bring at least some sort of innovation. A new percussion library at this point is basically just a different tone to the instruments, which might not be worth the time for such a busy company as spitfire.
 
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