Can anyone open & interpret a Cubase crash dump (Windows 10)?

Jeremy Gillam

Active Member
Hey everyone,

I've been getting a few crashes with Cubase 10.5.12 on Windows 10 Pro version 1909. Any chance someone can open and interpret the crash dumps to give some insight into what's causing the issue? A quick search didn't yield anything helpful and I suspect I'm out of my depth on this one.


Let me know if you need to know more regarding system specs, it's a computer I built myself that's been very stable until this point. Cheers,

Jeremy
 
OP
Jeremy Gillam

Jeremy Gillam

Active Member
That is the most bizarre band-aid solution I've ever heard of! I stuck a disabled Microshift on there, we'll see what happens. My more recent crash happened while I was tweaking parameters in ZebraHZ 2.8, I think the previous one was with trying to open Kontakt 5.
 

shomynik

Active Member
bizzare indeed...you can at least rule this out easily. I have mine disabled, just sitting there. Haven't had system this stable for a long time. But I recently went through other troubles as well to arrive here.

gl
 

msorrels

New Member
I took a look at your two crash dumps. The first one (ends in 597) crashes in a Windows message hook callback but I can't tell which plugin it's trying to call back into (the memory isn't in the dump) but based on the address and the load I'd suspect it's related to C:\Program Files (x86)\Waves\Plug-Ins V11\WavesLib5.0_11.0_Win64.dll which is a DLL that I think is part of Wave's plugins support. Though I don't see an actual Wave's plugin in the module load list. Which seems kind of odd. Not sure why it would be loaded by itself and why it would register a windows message hook. Crashes aren't always very clear when you don't have symbols though. Hard to tell what really happened.

The second crash is in ZebraHZ.vst3 looks like it dereferenced a null pointer.

Not sure knowing that helps you though. Usually to work out a crash you need to figure out a repeatable set of steps. For example the first crash could be something to do with removing a plugin from a project (I'm just guessing here, trying to explain why the Wave's support DLL is in memory but no Wave's plugin). The second one just looks like some sort of ZebraHZ bug, U-he might be able to have more luck telling what crashed since they would have symbols for it.
 
OP
Jeremy Gillam

Jeremy Gillam

Active Member
@msorrels Really appreciate you taking the time! My system should all be running 64-bits and in the case of Waves and Zebra as VST3 so I'm not sure why it would be looking for a Waves support file in a 32-bit folder. I know there's an update for ZebraHZ that I haven't installed yet because I use a skin that hasn't been updated yet. I also see some updates to Waves plugins so I'll run those and see if it helps. And now I have my trusty Microshift disabled in Control Room.

Cubase has generally been incredibly stable for me on a few computers since version 9 so I was a little surprised by the crashes. The only weak link to my system that I could think of is an NVIDIA graphics card I added recently, but it checked out with latencymon and a quick search of the forum showed people more recently having issues with AMD cards and Cubase 10 or 10.5.
 

msorrels

New Member
Waves stores its 64 bit stuff in the Program Files (x86) dir, don't let the path fool you. I think it's mainly for historical reasons, but it's pretty common for 64 bit apps to use the (x86) dir for everything. The Waves DLL loaded was a 64 bit DLL. But technically it's not a VST. It's a support DLL, it provides functions/services to an actual plugin. It's pretty common for developers to split things up like that. The fact it's in memory and very near the crash and there isn't any Wave plugin to go with it makes me think there is something odd about your Waves plugins. But with only one crash and no set of steps to reproduce it there is only so much you can tell. Reading crash dumps for software you don't have symbols and source for is kind of difficult to be sure what exactly happened or why.

You should update your nVidia video drivers, while some releases (and they are updated a lot) can be a little unstable, usually the good outweighs the bad. Nvidia does have a seperate set of drivers approved for use by creative users (3D artists mainly) that might be a good fit for audio workstations. I tried them for a while and wasn't impressed and went back to the game track (mainly my issues were they weren't updating the creative track even when there were known problems but were updating the game track). I don't think either of your crashes had anything to do with your video card though. But I still recommend users try to use the most current a version of nVidia drivers as they can.
 
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Jeremy Gillam

Jeremy Gillam

Active Member
Looks like my NVIDIA drivers are up to date. I believe I installed the "creative pro" drivers when I got this card; I'm not going to fiddle with it now as it has been super good otherwise. I pay my bills doing Photoshop work (or I did before the US economy imploded) -- I used to have an AMD card but wasn't playing nice with Adobe software hence the change. Tip for using game drivers is definitely helpful for future reference. Thanks again!