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Building my own little studio, need some resources

wst3

my office these days
Moderator
Dietz - excellent advise!! I'm not sure everyone has an easy time deciding when it is no longer a hobby... in fact I suspect that is when once can least afford it?

Here's my thing, and I feel somewhat alone when I say it, but there is so much bad advice on the internet. I no longer suggest it as a first source to folks who are trying to learn. And even with that there are books filled with nonsense.

So I end up repeating myself about studying the masters - Newell, Rettinger, Olson, Giddings, Beranek, and Cooper are my go-to authors, there are others.

I also advice that anyone with any interest put in the effort to learn something about the acoustics of small critical listening spaces. Even if you then choose to hire a designer you will be in a much better position to evaluate their philosophy and bias, and you will learn even more.
 

Nick Batzdorf

Moderator
Moderator
Okay, I have to say more about that "hobby" word.

Of the professional composers on this forum who make a living writing music - and there are quite a few - how many work in rooms that were designed professionally? And I'm not even talking about people like me who have worked a fair amount over the years but are prostitutes on the side.

I can tell you that of the ones I know in Los Angeles, both the percentage and number are incredibly low. Without dropping names, I can tell you that these are professionals with major film and network television credits.

Project studios are usually rooms in people's houses!
 

Dietz

Space Explorer
Project studios are usually rooms in people's houses!
Same here, same here, in my own place. Still professionally planned. :)

I worked with quite a few professional (and successful) composers / musicians who started out on a DIY-approach. During these collaborations I pestered all of them to invest in their respective listening environments. Once they got their working rooms right, they couldn't believe themselves what they missed before, and how much easier, more efficient and - most of all - how joyful they got stuff done.

And the best thing about it: Properly done acoustics don't need permanent upgrades. ;)
 

eph221

Member
All joking aside (I was going to mention the obligatory pic of Pat sajak), make sure the balance control is correct on your audio interface before doing anything. I had an interface that had a bias when the control said evenly balanced. There was actually a hard wired problem with it from the factory. I wonder how common this is?!
 
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Divico

Senior Member
All joking aside (I was going to mention the obligatory pic of Pat sajak), make sure the balance is correct on your audio interface before doing anything. I had an interface that had a bias when the control said evenly balanced. There was actually a hard wired problem with it from the factory. I wonder how common this is?!
what do you mean with balance? Left right? Balanced output?
 

Divico

Senior Member
All joking aside (I was going to mention the obligatory pic of Pat sajak), make sure the balance control is correct on your audio interface before doing anything. I had an interface that had a bias when the control said evenly balanced. There was actually a hard wired problem with it from the factory. I wonder how common this is?!
I think this is no common problem. What can be problematic i the effective balance you get in your sweat spot. Sonarworks tells me my right side is louder by 1db. May be due to the room, speakers, who knowd
 
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