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Best soundtracks lately?

EwigWanderer

Senior Member
This isn't really produced lately, but I discovered it few days ago.

The Film Music of Jerry Goldsmith. Played by LSO and conducted Jerry himself. Recorded at Abbey Road studios. SACD is from Telarc (everybody who knows Telarc understands).

The sound quality is superb! Only listened it in stereo, but there are multichannel versions of the tracks included. All soundtracks should be released with as good sound as this one. Especially Hans Zimmers.

http://www.sa-cd.net/showreviews/972
 

tokatila

Senior Member
Michael Giacchino - Jupiter Ascending.

Absolutely-freaking-awesome... 8)

 
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Living Fossil

Senior Member
Speaking about last years soundtracks, there were 3 i want to mention, for different reasons:

1. The Hobbit.
The interesting thing about this was - in my opinion, and it is meant cum grano salis - the complete absence of any kind of respect shown towards it.
Ok, it was far from being original in any way; it was the last of a six-part-puzzle (if you count in the LotR trilogy.
But nevertheless i think it's quite typical for our time, that handicraft has no value. You have to fit the actually desired clichees to get loads of praise for very few substance.
If you miss it, you can write a superior score, but nobody cares.

2. Birdman.
This was interesting. In some places, this solo drumming had a great psychological impact. It gave depth to M. Keatons character and maybe was the subcutaneous reason for his Oscar nomination. On the other hand it was interesting to see (and hear) that the director didn't wanted to have his film solved with drumming only. And that was the part that i didn't like about the soundtrack.
Rachmaninov's 2nd symphony (iirc) e.g. is one of those pieces that i really love and admire. But in the film it was just the wrong music. It was terrible, really terrible.
I think if there's compiled music in a film it should be chosen by somebody who has a slight idea about the hermeneutical and semantical meaning of the music he uses.
Anyhow, it was interesting to see how good a jazzy drumming can work in a movie.

3. Grand Budapest Hotel.
As music for a film and in a film this was really, really great.
The first thing i did after watching the film on DVD was rewatching it again.
The music itself is rather simple, but in a very intelligent way. The different themes and textures perfectly interact and create a musical organism that perfectly fits the pictures and story line. In the same time, they are extremely pregnant which adds structure to the dramaturgy.
 

Brendon Williams

Active Member
I buy nothing but Alberto Iglesias these days. Without ever having seen a film he scored, except for "Tinker Tailor" and "La Moine". But I quickly discovered that I simply have to have everything the man has ever released, from his earliest ("La Camarera Del Titanic" is the earliest I can find) to his most recent ("The Two Faces Of January").
There's plenty of phenomally good composers at work in films these days, but at the moment ― and it's a moment which started three years ago, with "Tinker Tailor", and I don't see it ending anytime soon ― Iglesias excites, enchants and impresses me most of all, and by some distance. Supremely talented musician.

_
Thanks for this! I wasn't familiar with Alberto Iglesias, and Tinker Tailor's soundtrack is amazingly beautiful! Love the mix on this as well. The drum sound reminds me of ECM records.
 

tack

Damned Dirty Ape
Thought i'd mention a game i really loved.
Ori and the blind forest!
Thread necromancy to give this a +1. I just finished this game, and agree that the soundtrack is really quite good. Excellent use of themes and development through the course of the game.

And recorded by a live orchestra!

 

Patrick

Member
I say give Austin Wintory's score for Abzu a listen. It' gorgeous! Or even better, go play the game. It's a short (2-3h) but intensive experience.

Ori really has some great music, so +1 on that. Very studio ghibli/Joe Hisaishi-esque!
 
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