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Audiobro Modern Scoring Brass (MSB)

whitewasteland

Senior Member
Given the (impressive) instrument list focusing on individual players and classic articulations, I wouldn't call it "Modern" like, for instance, Heavyocity's Forzo is modern.

What claims to be "Modern" is the library itself, with all its technical features. Looks truely next gen !
 

Saxer

Senior Member
Still a quarter of a year to wait... but this announcement will probably block a lot of brass sales until then.
In full use this library alone could utilize a slave to the full.
The instrument list is impressive. Especially for concert band writers there's no real alternative right now.
 

constaneum

Senior Member
Still a quarter of a year to wait... but this announcement will probably block a lot of brass sales until then.
In full use this library alone could utilize a slave to the full.
The instrument list is impressive. Especially for concert band writers there's no real alternative right now.
only if they manage to come out a walkthrough by early next month to hold back other sales. because we're only reading the technical but not hearing any demos or seeing any walkthrough to be convinced.
 

NoamL

Winter <3
Yeah. At this point it will take some amazing demos from other companies to keep me from pulling the trigger on CSB. That's not a certainty yet either, but it's probable after the walkthrough. The convenience of having everything working with CSS, recorded in the same room, with the known programming qualities of CS series, plus reasonable RAM loads and a great discount price, it kind of all adds up to be irresistible!
 
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SoNowWhat?

realised I can type here
Yeah. At this point it will take some amazing demos from other companies to keep me from pulling the trigger on CSB. That's not a certainty yet either, but it's probable after the walkthrough. The convenience of having everything working with CSS, recorded in the same room, with the known programming qualities of CS series, plus reasonable RAM loads and a great discount price, it kind of all adds up to be irresistible!
I see what you mean and have been thinking similar thoughts. Already thinking ahead and wondering if Audiobro will do a big band expansion with those sorts of techniques and articulations as an expansion (like con-sord in LASS).
 

ptram

Senior Member
they specifically said we will be pleasantly surprised by comparison to the other offerings on the market. Who even buys VSL in 2019? :whistling:
Developers need to adapt and I am sure they are going to consider Cinematic Series, Spitfire, 8Dio, the @AlexanderSchiborr library, i.e. their main competition at this point
The level of detail and required resources seem to appeal to professionals, more than occasional users. Someone who needs to write for separate parts, not in sections. But they can anyway offer some "simplified" patches, and make it accessible to a wider audience.

Paolo
 

Eptesicus

Senior Member
On paper it sounds amazing. All that matters really though is how it sounds...

I hope they release some demos soon!
 

HelixK

Active Member
The level of detail and required resources seem to appeal to professionals, more than occasional users. Someone who needs to write for separate parts, not in sections. But they can anyway offer some "simplified" patches, and make it accessible to a wider audience.
I could not disagree more. If we're talking about professional, high profile composers, CSB is the most appealing library currently available at the market. Why? Ease of use. See Noam's post above. Do you think James Newton Howard, Hans Zimmer or any of the top trailer guys care about separate parts or how accurate they can shape the attack of 1 in 1.000.000.000 staccatissimo notes of an ostinato line? No, they want "simplified" patches that simply work and get the job done.

Working composers only care about the end result and how fast they can get from point A to B. It's dog eat dog out there. Don't underestimate the power of simplicity. Of all current brass libraries in the market right now, CSB is the one that can be tagged as a true game changer and "next-gen" because it offers the working composer the best of all worlds: workflow, sound, price.

Things have changed, we're way past 2005 and Symphonic Cube monopoly. In 2019 even the small developer can change the game. Look at Performance Samples. Want to talk big and bold? Look at Big Bad Horns. Individual parts, a ridiculously large list of articulations, 449€. That's adapting and making your way into the templates of a wider audience.
 

Kony

Bad ape
I could not disagree more. If we're talking about professional, high profile composers, CSB is the most appealing library currently available at the market. Why? Ease of use. See Noam's post above. Do you think James Newton Howard, Hans Zimmer or any of the top trailer guys care about separate parts or how accurate they can shape the attack of 1 in 1.000.000.000 staccatissimo notes of an ostinato line? No, they want "simplified" patches that simply work and get the job done.

Working composers only care about the end result and how fast they can get from point A to B. It's dog eat dog out there. Don't underestimate the power of simplicity. Of all current brass libraries in the market right now, CSB is the one that can be tagged as a true game changer and "next-gen" because it offers the working composer the best of all worlds: workflow, sound, price.

Things have changed, we're way past 2005 and Symphonic Cube monopoly. In 2019 even the small developer can change the game. Look at Performance Samples. Want to talk big and bold? Look at Big Bad Horns. Individual parts, a ridiculously large list of articulations, 449€. That's adapting and making your way into the templates of a wider audience.
Nicely put
 

jamwerks

Senior Member
I love the philosophy behind this. BB was a great idea, but the playability lacks for me. The auto-divisi should make it just as easy as a normal library. Having then Woodwinds done the same way will be a real treat.

I can't imagine there not being E-flat trumpets in his line-up, and not sure of the utility of having the "octavino" B-flat trumpets, that to my ears have a distinctly baroque connotation. The modern composers (non cinema) that I know of use E-flat trps and call them "Petits Trompettes". That said, I'm not a brass player...

One reason for them to throw this out and get us talking is to test the market for pricing. The size actually seems small considering there's 28 soloists. So this version may just be the basic arts & half of the final product. Anyway I doubt we'll have mutes & extended arts right at the beginning.

They may sell this at $999 to get the most folks on-board for the final version at double the price.

We'll see what a future Synchron Brass plays and sounds like. I was thinking of Spitfire might also do a VSL-type, top tier line. Interesting times!
 

Raphioli

Active Member
One reason for them to throw this out and get us talking is to test the market for pricing.

While the price is still to be determined, we believe you will be pleasantly surprised by comparison to the other offerings on the market, especially considering the depth and scope of Modern Scoring Brass!
I saw this on their website and by this, I'm guessing it will be around the same as Berlin Brass or lower, since it says we'll be "pleasantly surprised".
 

Pixelpoet1985

Active Member
Actually, this is going to be an instant buy for me. I love LASS, it's my go-to library. And, helloooo, no other company has auto-divisi. This is a killer feature for brass. I'm so happy that they recorded individual instruments! :dancer:

Interesting for me is how the ensemble sounds when combining the individual instruments. It's not easy to get this ensemble sound, there is much going on within.

Concerning the name... I think it's not recorded in LA, but in Budapest like they did with Genesis Choir and NI Symphony Strings.
 
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ptram

Senior Member
Do you think James Newton Howard, Hans Zimmer or any of the top trailer guys care about separate parts or how accurate they can shape the attack of 1 in 1.000.000.000 staccatissimo notes of an ostinato line?
I don't know about JNH (who still likes to orchestrate with pencil and paper), but watching at the list of articulations in Spitfire's Hans Zimmer Strings, I would suspect HZ is interested in separate parts writing and variety of articulations. This new library from Audiobro, with separate instruments and no sampled sections, seems to appeal to that kind of composer.

Paolo
 

ptram

Senior Member
Concerning the name... I think it's not recorded in LA, but in Budapest like they did with Genesis Choir and NI Symphony Strings.
I guess the name of LASS refers to the preferred use in hollywoodian scores. Now, is "modern" referring to fresher independent movie scoring, contemporary concert music, or trap music?

Paolo
 

HelixK

Active Member
I don't know about JNH (who still likes to orchestrate with pencil and paper)
As far as I'm aware, the bulk of JNH's work, including orchestrations, is done straight into Cubase. I've seen him going on record more than once in saying that studios expect him to deliver the most realistic demos, in the narrowest window of time possible. If you dig through youtube you will find the quotes.

The main title for Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them was done 41 times, including polished mockups.


Do you believe James and his team have the luxury of going through bloated libraries? There's no surprise why you find Spitfire libraries in virtually every high profile composer template. They sound amazing out of the box and are a delight to use. Cinematic Studio Brass is a big improvement in sound, workflow and price. That is why CSB will sell like hotcakes.

watching at the list of articulations in Spitfire's Hans Zimmer Strings, I would suspect HZ is interested in separate parts writing and variety of articulations. This new library from Audiobro, with separate instruments and no sampled sections, seems to appeal to that kind of composer.
HZS is not really comparable to CMB, as it's far from a traditional orchestral library and of all composers to talk about part writing, you chose Hans Zimmer? :confused: Don't want to start a debate, I'm a big fan for reasons that go beyond his skills (or lack of) as an orchestrator, but I'm also willing to learn, so please educate me of any scores he actually did any complex brass orchestrations by himself. I don't see the appeal of CMB to a composer like Hans. Or were you talking about his team?

If you prefer we can have this conversation privately as I don't to derail the thread by going too far off-topic.
 
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