Audiobro Modern Scoring Brass (MSB)

fantasy sound

New Member
Pardon my lack of knowledge....i thought it's more commonly used for strings where as in brass, mostly called mute instead of con sordino right ?
I guess the preference of the word mute over con sordino is largely influenced by the various brass “mute” types in jazz.

In classical music scores, on the other hand, con sordino can equally be used for both brass and strings, and it indicates muting by means of an actual mute, not by hand.
 

Eptesicus

Senior Member
I must admit this seems like a game changer! The first demo in particular sounds phenomenal in my opinion.

What will the full price be, as im very tempted to get this even though i cant afford it!
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
its odd that there was a wave of doubt in the first day or so, and then suddenly a wave of positive opinions. Regardless of how we feel about the sound (since its totally subjective) we can't deny the concept and execution puts MSB in a league of its own.
 

Eptesicus

Senior Member
its odd that there was a wave of doubt in the first day or so, and then suddenly a wave of positive opinions. Regardless of how we feel about the sound (since its totally subjective) we can't deny the concept and execution puts MSB in a league of its own.
I can understand some of the doubt. The trumpets don't sound quite as good as i would have liked, but they don't sound bad by any means. The horns sounds absolutely gorgeous and perhaps the best sounding horns i have heard, sample library wise.
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
I can understand some of the doubt. The trumpets don't sound quite as good as i would have liked, but they don't sound bad by any means. The horns sounds absolutely gorgeous and perhaps the best sounding horns i have heard, sample library wise.
i suppose my issue is the tone of the brass doesn't fit in the places where I normally use brass in the way i use them. Perhaps this library will inspire new types of writing. The nature of these things right? you really won't know if it fits until you try.
 

Eptesicus

Senior Member
i suppose my issue is the tone of the brass doesn't fit in the places where I normally use brass in the way i use them. Perhaps this library will inspire new types of writing. The nature of these things right? you really won't know if it fits until you try.
True.

I'm torn now. I was going to get cinematic studio brass as i have cinematic studio strings. But, whilst this is double the price, what it offers seems to be leaps ahead of CSB.

Sounds wise i still love how CSB sounds, but the auto divisi and amount of instruments and articulations in MSB is huge.

However, there is no doubt CSB will blend better with CSS.

Argh
 

chocobitz825

Senior Member
True.

I'm torn now. I was going to get cinematic studio brass as i have cinematic studio strings. But, whilst this is double the price, what it offers seems to be leaps ahead of CSB.

Sounds wise i still love how CSB sounds, but the auto divisi and amount of instruments and articulations in MSB is huge.

However, there is no doubt CSB will blend better with CSS.

Argh
CSB has been, for me, incredibly playable, but not incredible dynamic. Its got some great strong tone, but I find that Ive not been satisfied with its dynamics. It seems like its mostly just allowing you to adjust the volume on the same pretty strong attacked samples. I've definitely felt better dynamic range from Orchestral Tools and Spitfire.
 

kevthurman

Active Member
Pardon my lack of knowledge....i thought it's more commonly used for strings where as in brass, mostly called mute instead of con sordino right ?
"Con Sordino" is simply Italian for "with mute". It's common to see it also in brass parts. Hell, I've even seen it in some woodwind parts, but usually those are more specific to the piece. Also common to see "with mute" in string parts.
 

Eptesicus

Senior Member
Does anyone think the colour scheme and marketing material is remarkably similar to that used in Forzo? :P

To be honest, this makes a library like Forzo seem quite expensive in comparison.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Does anyone think the colour scheme and marketing material is remarkably similar to that used in Forzo? :P

To be honest, this makes a library like Forzo seem quite expensive in comparison.
They both have a big brass knob, and some of the color scheme for the rest of the GUI follows from that, but I mean they are both brass libraries, so that's not exactly surprising.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
Well the black and gold with light spots i mean - pretty similar if you ask me :P

https://heavyocity.com/product/forzo/
https://audiobro.com/modern-scoring-brass/
To me, it looks to me more like their Genesis library (maybe also their symphony series string library for NI) combined with the tile idea for articulations from CSS/CSB (or whoever it is that pioneered that layout). Then using a brass inspired color scheme. Just like Forzo takes the basic idea of Novo and applied a brass inspired color scheme.
 

NoamL

Winter <3
CSB has been, for me, incredibly playable, but not incredible dynamic. Its got some great strong tone, but I find that Ive not been satisfied with its dynamics. It seems like its mostly just allowing you to adjust the volume on the same pretty strong attacked samples. I've definitely felt better dynamic range from Orchestral Tools and Spitfire.
My experience is the opposite! :) The dynamic range is p-ff on the legatos and mp-fff on the marcato sustains.
 

josejherring

Senior Member
People complaining of the thin sound in the trumpets, in the first example that thin sound is actually more of an orchestration issue with regards to range and perhaps writing straight triads for trumpets. Gets kind of that Mariachi tone. The second example by ED W doesn't suffer from that initially. Trumpets are a little lower and supported underneath by trombones and later horns--leads to a fuller sound.

Personally I've found that in my experience the Bflat trumpets are thin sounding once above their high g. I've run into issues with that. I prefer C trumpets, they sound fuller and a little less "bandy" sounding to me. I think C trumpet if I remember correctly is preferred by most orchestral players, but of that I'm not sure, maybe it was just in New York.

Towards the end the demo by Ed Watkins falls into the trap of the awkward orchestration for trumpets, that lone solo high thing screaming in perfect intonation with out even so much as a little note crack or intonation adjustment, dead give away for samples, but up until then and I hate saying this If I heard it out of context I'd probably be inclined to think it was a real section especially in the opening 11 sec.

Also, for that high exposed stuff I'd lean on Sample Modeling The Trumpet where you can add a little crack and intonation difficulties and wobbling in to the programming.
 

josejherring

Senior Member
Personally the more I listen the more I'm staring to love this library. Low brass is excellent. I'd love to hear more demos that show off a range. Brass quintet, soft passages in orchestral settings ect. Really hear the range of what can be done. There are already so many libraries that can do that "hollywood" sound, I'd like to hear other types of sounds since that "Hollywood" sound has become more cliché and going forward we'll need to produce a different range of sounds.
 

Hanu_H

Senior Member
People complaining of the thin sound in the trumpets, in the first example that thin sound is actually more of an orchestration issue with regards to range and perhaps writing straight triads for trumpets. Gets kind of that Mariachi tone. The second example by ED W doesn't suffer from that initially. Trumpets are a little lower and supported underneath by trombones and later horns--leads to a fuller sound.

Personally I've found that in my experience the Bflat trumpets are thin sounding once above their high g. I've run into issues with that. I prefer C trumpets, they sound fuller and a little less "bandy" sounding to me. I think C trumpet if I remember correctly is preferred by most orchestral players, but of that I'm not sure, maybe it was just in New York.

Towards the end the demo by Ed Watkins falls into the trap of the awkward orchestration for trumpets, that lone solo high thing screaming in perfect intonation with out even so much as a little note crack or intonation adjustment, dead give away for samples, but up until then and I hate saying this If I heard it out of context I'd probably be inclined to think it was a real section especially in the opening 11 sec.

Also, for that high exposed stuff I'd lean on Sample Modeling The Trumpet where you can add a little crack and intonation difficulties and wobbling in to the programming.
What I can see in the GUI, adding some Sizzle and detune could fix that problem with the high trumpet notes...