Are we horribly spoilt?

Apostate

Active Member
Put it this way, I feel better than spoilt (more like heavenly blessed) whenever my music gets played by actual instrumentalists. Everything else is second place at best.
 

Desire Inspires

To the stars through desire....
Spoilt? Not even close.

I think we are just catching up to where things should be. Making music was so difficult for so long, even with the few advances in technology from the 20th century.

I still see need for improvement in many things. One day at a time I guess.
 

Saxer

Senior Member
The main difference is that even hobbyists have access to full professional tools today. This doesn't concern music only. Most amateur bands have a high end PA in the garage. Every second holiday surfer has a Jason Stevenson surfboard. High end animation software and quadcopters are mainstream as well. Consumer cameras with cinematic resolution. Nothing costs more than an average car. It's a professional hobby market.

The difference is still the time you can invest in things you want to do. That didn't change.
 

Ashermusic

Senior Member
Spoilt? Not even close.

I think we are just catching up to where things should be. Making music was so difficult for so long, even with the few advances in technology from the 20th century.

I still see need for improvement in many things. One day at a time I guess.
Creating good music should be somewhat difficult. That way, musicians become better and more skilled. Otherwise, they just do what is easy.
 

kimgaboury

New Member
I don't think we are spoiled. Even if making good sounding music has become super cheap and easy, making fkn great music that sounds unique is still as hard as it ever was.
 

Geoff Grace

Senior Member
I was spoiled to be alive in the '60s when musicians were revered in a way they aren't now, and music was front and center in a rapid-fire pace of social change.

I was spoiled to be alive in the '70s when creativity blossomed, and progressive rock and jazz fusion pushed the boundaries of what popular music could do.

I was spoiled to be alive in the '80s when music technology began to explode: analog synthesis became more affordable, and digital synthesis and sampling burst onto the scene.

I was spoiled to be alive in the '90s when digital recording became more affordable, and personal computers gave us new ways to record and alter sound.

I was spoiled to be alive in the '00s when sampling jumped from megabytes to gigabytes, and libraries became more realistic.

And I am spoiled to be alive today when virtual instruments and effects are a booming business and more sophisticated and affordable than ever before.

Best,

Geoff
 
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R. Soul

Senior Member
It's not entirely a new thing that quality sound can be had for cheap or even free.

When I started out in 1990/1991, the first music I made was done using a free sequencer with free samples.
It was a tracker called Soundtracker. Music was made on 4 tracks, all being monophonic, so if you triggered a snare and had a hihat a 16th later, the snare would be cut off. There was no round robins, no velocity layers and if you wanted chords you'd have to use several of your 4 channels - unless you had a sampled chord of course.
It was a bit limited, but still, it was free to make music.

So if we are spoiled - we've been spoiled for 30 years really.
 

purple

Member
Creating good music should be somewhat difficult. That way, musicians become better and more skilled. Otherwise, they just do what is easy.
It'll always be hard to write music. Technology breaks down the barriers to workflow allowing greater creativity, but technology does not allow people who wouldn't be able to write to suddenly understand music theory.
 

dgburns

summer of pickles and IPA beer
It's crazy what we have at our fingertips.

It's crazy how it still comes down to talent, hard work and ears .... and theory.

and it gets more humbling as the years go by. WTF is up with that?
 

AndyP

Senior Member
After taking the time last weekend to listen through the different libraries I have now, especially in the area of strings, I realize that there is nothing special missing.
It's always worth comparing the components of the library you own, because I notice that I don't know anything as well as I thought.
Suddenly sounds that I didn't do anymore and rarely used sound really good again and they get more into my focus.
I have fallen into a sale madness and have bought things that I, after closer examination, more or less already had. Or at least so similar that it is irrelevant in use.
I often hear the nuances individually, in interaction they disappear more and more.
Again and again I read here contributions from people who, for example, hear the Hollywood strings and then say, oh, but they sound good even though they are so old.
The good effect for me to compare all those is that I now ask myself more often, do I really need that? And more and more my answer is, no.
I've bought a lot this month on sale and I'm fine with it, but somehow I have the feeling I have to put an end to this insanity and just live and work with what I have now.
A feeling of supersaturation begins to set in and slowly it seems to hinder me more than it takes me forward.
The time a tool takes to get to know it fully is getting shorter because the next great toy there is just arousing more interest.
Exactly that was completely different before, every millimeter of a filter was tested, and the sight of buttons and faders in the dark created a very special atmosphere.