What's new

Apple introduces first 8-core MacBook Pro

Soundhound

Senior Member
I have the same mbp, bought it second hand in 2014 or 2015 and I've never had a problem with it. The 16 gigs of ram was always a limitation, but it's always done the jobs I bought it for without complaint. There I jinxed it, it'll be a doorstop next time I open it up...



On the other side my late-2012 MBP i7 has been the epitome of reliability. Swapped out the HD for an SSD, upgraded to 16GB. For the tasks I now require it, it still works great. It’s lived in and out of my bag for that entire time, so not exactly a sheltered life.
 

Nick Batzdorf

Moderator
Moderator
I would not touch an Apple Notebook with a ten foot pole right now. Since 2010
My early 2014 11" MacBook Air is the best computer ever.

It's not for studio work - although it's fine for light-duty recording - but it's fabulous for traveling (or waiting rooms, etc.).

Never mind that Apple still refuses to embrace touchscreens and multitouch in their OSX computer products
There are totally reasonable arguments for that, so I wouldn't say "refuses" is the right word.

I do wish they’d stop focusing on making “pro” laptops thinner though!
I agree 100% about thinner - who cares - however *lighter* (than laptops used to be) is important to me.
 

Dewdman42

Senior Member
What percentage of them has issues?

I'm certainly not apologizing, just asking the question.
Obviously have no way of knowing the answer to that ridiculous question, but if you do your homework you will find out that my experience was not that unusual and Apple's response was consistent.
 

Phil81

Active Member
some people are luckier then others. Do the research. You've been warned
I jumped ship after 20 years+ of using Apple computers. Couldn't be happier. It took me a while and some knowledge about networking to get VEP to work flawlessly. It was a technical feature that I was unaware of.

I do understand that Windows PC is not for anyone. I'm not trying to be cheeky.

PCs, coupled with Windows 10 and some computer knowledge are far more efficient and productive (not necessarily cheaper) than any current Mac in the market.
 
Last edited:

Dewdman42

Senior Member

So actually this guy didn't "figure it out". His buddy did. He just made the video explaining it that has been referenced by many people seeking help on the issue, and getting none from Apple.
 
Last edited:

T-LeffoH

#CitizenSleuth
PCs, coupled with Windows 10 and some computer knowledge are far more efficient and productive (not necessarily cheaper) than any current Mac in the market.
In my experience, most any brand-name PC build with comparable or better specs in areas like RAM, storage, graphics, and warranty will undoubtedly be cheaper than the Mac. Custom builds can be done for even less.

I've also noticed the warranty service available for PCs is far more expansive with the broader Windows user base. On call, on site support technicians showing up next day to replace a failed motherboard or other components has been a life saver for me when it comes to avoiding downtime.
 

N.Caffrey

Senior Member
I would not touch an Apple Notebook with a ten foot pole right now. Since 2010 they have had a series of hardware problems which Apple has not rectified or in some cases in even acknowledged. I have a 2010 MBP that started kernel panicking whenever the Nvidia CPU kicked on, about 3.5 years after I bought it, when it was updated to Mavericks. Scoured the internet for answers. Apple had no clue. Most people had no clue. People were being told by apple to buy a $700 replacement logic board, which would go bad again in a few months. AppleCare did nothing about it. For a while people were using a little utility that would disable the Nvidia GPU, but that didn't always work right. Then an electronics engineer figured out that the problem was that Apple used an inexpensive capacitor in a certain place on the logic board, that can have a problem when the CPU speed changes. For a few hundred bucks he can solder in a higher quality capacitor and the problem is gone. This turned out to be the real issue. Someone wrote a little kext hack eventually that basically prevents cpu speed stepping from happening, and prevents the kernel panics, but the GPU is not running at full speed that way. I have been using mine every since using that kext hack, its getting too old to justify a few hundred bucks to fix the capacitor, but I might because I am definitely not going to buy a new Apple notebook anytime soon!

Now is this an isolated incident? Nope. Use google, numerous Apple notebooks came out since 2010 with weird problems that the geniuses at Apple's "Genius Bar" were clueless about and Apple did not ever really fix the problem or acknowledge it, people were just SOL. I will not touch Apple notebooks at all now, until their reputation improves, particularly one as expensive as this one! Mine was $4000+ in 2010 and it turned into nothing but a huge hassle. Lots of people suffered for years with kernel panics and not knowing what to do until that independent electronics engineer figured out it was the capacitor, a $3 part.

Never mind that Apple still refuses to embrace touchscreens and multitouch in their OSX computer products, their notebooks may look nice with a fast CPU and elegant looking case, but they are far behind the competition, priced in the stratosphere and you can expect no help from Apple when it turns out their fancy design has flaws.
Have a 2013 MacBook Pro, never had a problem in 7 years! I'm actually surprised and pleased it still works so well.
 

Wolfie2112

Senior Member
Have a 2013 MacBook Pro, never had a problem in 7 years! I'm actually surprised and pleased it still works so well.
I also have a 2013. It cost me nearly $3K, but it has been SOLID for the past six years. It owed me nothing after the first year, and I know I can rely on it for every single deadline....it has literally never crashed (with the exception of a bad VEPro 5 update). I would never in a million years put that faith into a Windows laptop (I have gone through two of those in the past five years....and just for non-musical tasks!). So hey, if a pro composer wants to spend $6500 on a reliable machine, go nuts, especially if it's the nucleus of your studio. I'll be upgrading later this year, either the new Mac Pro or MB Pro.
 

PeterKorcek

Active Member
It is true for me as well. Still have 2013 MB Pro and it has been working great, not a single crash. Can dual boot Windows as well for some windows related tasks.
What troubles me beside the prices is that stupid Touchbar, faulty keyobard, heat issues - in general, not really keen on spending so much money for laptop with these things and windows laptops caught up in many ways as well. Tough choice!
 

Damarus

Active Member
"we averaged a score of 3096 on this machine in Cinebench R20 —well above the 2019 13-inch MacBook Pro with 2.4 GHz i5 processor we benchmarked that earned a 1779"

lol.. Id hope so, its double the cores.

94 degrees around 3ghz is better than the 2018 variant, but still not great at the $3000 price tag.

Again, you don't buy a notebook for performance. You buy it for portability.
 

Vik

Scandi Member
Again, you don't buy a notebook for performance. You buy it for portability.
Some also buy a laptop as their main computer, which is why it's great that they now have an 8-core with up to 32 gb RAM. Let's hope an option for more RAM will be the next step.
 
Last edited:

whinecellar

Jim Daneker
Some also buy a laptop as their main computer, which is why it's great that they now have an 8-core which 32 gb RAM. Let's hope an option for more RAM will be the next step.
Yep. I wish 64 GB were an option, but man, my main machine was a 2014 quad core i7 MacBook Pro (with just 16 GB RAM) for the last 5 years, and thanks to VE Pro, worked perfectly in the studio even on huge projects - my template was around 900 tracks.

My new 6 core MB Pro with 32 GB RAM is a monster, and I can foresee getting quite a lot done when traveling!
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom