What's new

Anyone want to make a VSTi with me?

Phryq

AlbertMcKay.com
So I have a 10 year old boy (my student) who can sing "ah" in pitch with good tone. I live with him, and have lots of time to work with him.

I thought, if I recorded legato intervals; maybe up to an octave, at 2, or 3 velocity layers, very dry (using a dynamic supercardioid) then someone who knows scripting could phase-align and make it into a VSTi. If you prefer, I could also buy a CAD e100s for it (I like the mic). And blend the 2 mics (or if you want, we'd deal with the thing like a single 'stereo' file, but really dual mono).

I can do some grunt-work - EQing each sample, or anything else that doesn't require scripting know-how.

I think we could make a good single-purpose instrument!

Or if you wanted to keep it simple, only record 1 velocity layer (maybe add more later if you love it). I'd like the quiets to be whispery, but I'm open, and very happy if anyone who knows what they're doing wants to work with me.

You can have 99% ownership; I just want the instrument!
 

kurtvanzo

Capt. Zorro
The scripting is very possible, and I like the idea of this instrument. But to be clear it's the phase aligning of the samples that is difficult. Chris Hein's admittingly stated that he met a genius programmer who could align samples with custom programs, and that made his instruments possible. The process involves splitting the signal into separate pure tone and "noise" tracks (anything that was not the pure tone), aligning the pure tones, then adding the "noise" back. The process is proprietary AFAIK. But it's nice of him to outline the process at 2:46 in this video:


But there is a process within Kontakt that would be interesting to try 2 or 3 dynamic layers. Would you get shorts as well as longs? That might be interesting to try as a first pass. When you get the recording done, let us know.
 
Last edited:
OP
Phryq

Phryq

AlbertMcKay.com
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Ok, so then I'm thinking maybe only record 1 velocity layer (I hate x-fade sounds).

If 1 layer is successful, we could add a second, and I think it would be best to have a keyswitch the trigger layers, then CC volume of that layer (to avoid x-fading badness).

At first I think I'd like to record sustains only. My main worry is pushing the kid too far (I actually teach him Math, history, science, piano, guitar, composition, English, and French). So if we could get 1 layer, sustains, legato done, then when he hears the final product, he can be motivated to record more.

Not to get sentimental, but to me, it will be such a nice thing to remember him by (he'll be leaving to boarding school in 1 year).
 
Last edited:
OP
Phryq

Phryq

AlbertMcKay.com
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
Thanks Lindon, but that link is talking about making an instrument with many layers, round robins, etc....

I'm thinking of making a 1 layer, 0 round robins, single articulation instrument. That can still sound very good if you compose creatively with it.


That Chris Hein vid... the instruments together all sound amazing. I listened to an attempt to put all his instruments into an orchestra the other day, and it wasn't so great, but that recording sounds awesome. His instruments are just insane, but I think you really have to know them; anyone who does has by far the best library in existence.
 
Last edited:
OP
Phryq

Phryq

AlbertMcKay.com
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
So since this is a single layer, legato, no RR instrument, the only scripting needed would be to trigger which legato interval to play. Does an dry voice need release samples? It doesn't make a sound on the end (like a string player letting go of the string, or a piano's hammer stopping the note), so would it sound as good with no release samples (and reverb of course applied)?
 
OP
Phryq

Phryq

AlbertMcKay.com
Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Ok, so I'm watching this. It seems basically I just record each interval (c - c#, c - d, c - e, c - f, c - f#) etc. and I'll have him hold the second note as long as he can (or should they all be the same, e.g. 8 beats), keeping the volume as even as possible.

And on top of that, I should record simple sustains (which would be triggered as the first note of each phrase).

24 notes x 12 intervals (if I have 2 octaves of samples with a 1 octave legato limit) = 288 recordings, right? I'm guessing if he did everything perfectly, non-stop without mistakes it could take 1 hour? But of course, it will likely take much longer.

 

Lindon

VST/AU Developer
Thanks Lindon, but that link is talking about making an instrument with many layers, round robins, etc....

I'm thinking of making a 1 layer, 0 round robins, single articulation instrument. That can still sound very good if you compose creatively with it.


That Chris Hein vid... the instruments together all sound amazing. I listened to an attempt to put all his instruments into an orchestra the other day, and it wasn't so great, but that recording sounds awesome. His instruments are just insane, but I think you really have to know them; anyone who does has by far the best library in existence.


No its talking about making a reasonably complex instrument with say legato processing, isnt that what you are proposing?
 
Top Bottom