An easier way to loop multi-mic samples in Kontakt?

willbedford

Composer/Programmer
Hi everyone,

I'm working on a patch that has multiple microphone perspectives. I need to loop the sustain samples, making sure that the loop points of each note are the same on all 3 microphones. Is there an easy way to edit multiple zones at once, or will I have to manually edit each one individually?

I was hoping for a way to do this with a script, but the only functions that look vaguely useful are zone_slice_idx_loop_start() and zone_slice_idx_loop_end(), and these only seem to return the current loop points, and cannot set new ones.

Any suggestions would be highly appreciated.
 

d.healey

Music Monkey
I'm guessing he was referring to the cog (command) menu in the wave editor. I prefer to loop one mic position using an external program, load all the samples in to reaper and transfer the loop points over to all of the other mic positions, then load them into Kontakt and add a crossfade.
 

Tod

Senior Member
Like David, I use Reaper for this to, although I do it all in Reaper. With Reaper you can customize it to do just about anything you want. I know you use pro-tools Nils, but I think Reaper is kind of a sample editors dream. :) Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting you switch to, or even use Reaper, I'm just relating my own experience.

This little video is kind of outrageous, but it does show some of the possibilities with Reaper. I actually do use this method for making sample loops in Reaper, but usually it's quite a bit different, every sample project is different.

Heh heh, I think David will probably find this amusing and Like I said it is a little outrageous.

How to make 12 perfectly seamless loops in Reaper, in 3 minutes.:grin: Actually it only takes a minute to create the loops.

 
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well, my project uses beat machine mode
and manual slice markers so i need to copy the manual slices to all the same loops
instead of re slicing them.
any ideas ??
 

Nils Neumann

Active Member
Like David, I use Reaper for this to, although I do it all in Reaper. With Reaper you can customize it to do just about anything you want. I know you use pro-tools Nils, but I think Reaper is kind of a sample editors dream. :) Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting you switch to, or even use Reaper, I'm just relating my own experience.

This little video is kind of outrageous, but it does show some of the possibilities with Reaper. I actually do use this method for making sample loops in Reaper, but usually it's quite a bit different, every sample project is different.

Heh heh, I think David will probably find this amusing and Like I said it is a little outrageous.

How to make 12 perfectly seamless loops in Reaper, in 3 minutes.:grin: Actually it only takes a minute to create the loops.

After naming 2000 samples by hand, I slowly beginn to realize that Reaper seems to be a little bit faster...^^
 

Tod

Senior Member
After naming 2000 samples by hand, I slowly beginn to realize that Reaper seems to be a little bit faster...^^
Oh wow, yeah, there's various ways to speed up naming samples in Reaper. I haven't manually named samples for quite a while. No matter what your naming convention is, I think there's a way in Reaper to speed up the process significantly.

One of the things that comes up often with sample names, is to include the exact note that is the root note of the sample (C1, D1, E1, F#1, etc..). With Reaper you can create midi items that will have the the exact note names of each particular note. Then with a press of a button you can add the note names to the regions. Then when you save the samples you can include the region names along with wildcards and create any sequenced name that you want, including numbering them with padded numbers.

This is a quick little video I put together showing the note names, items, and regions. When the video is near the end, quickly look at the note names, and then the region names. That's the perfect source for your sample names. :)

 

d.healey

Music Monkey
I always prefer to name samples using MIDI note numbers, because some systems use C4 as middle C and some C3 but MIDI note 60 is always middle C. The fastest way I've found to do this in Reaper is with the label processor.
 

Tod

Senior Member
I always prefer to name samples using MIDI note numbers, because some systems use C4 as middle C and some C3 but MIDI note 60 is always middle C. The fastest way I've found to do this in Reaper is with the label processor.
Okay David, You're definitely smarter than me on this. So are you saying if the sample has the note number in it, it will automatically go to that number when you load the samples into Kontakt? I'm not sure how to do that, but like I said, you know more than I do.

Please explain, it might still be able to be don in Reaper.
 

polypx

Hoser
If you have hundreds or thousands of samples, and you organize by note ... for me it's nice to have all the note 60s or 61s sort beside each other, rather than C3s beside the C4s with the C#3s in between. Makes for easier organization.
 

Tod

Senior Member
Thanks polypx, but I think that's what I'm talking about. First of all you don't have hundreds of thousands of samples sitting in the same folder, right. If that's the case then I'm not sure what to say.

As far as the numbering I'm talking about, they do line up with note 60 just below note 61. I guess if you've used odd note intervals differently, for example: C1 to D1 then D#1 to F#1, it might be a problem, but I don't think there's a way around that, is there. :)
 

Tod

Senior Member
Yes Kontakt will map note numbers in the same way it maps note names using the auto mapper
Aah, thanks David, I've been programming samples in Kontakt since K2 and I did not know this. Is there any particular form the name has to be in to do this or can the note name or number be anywhere in the name?
 

d.healey

Music Monkey
Yeah it can go anywhere although there is a limit on the number of name segments Kontakt will recognise - I think it's 7