Aiva - Artificial Intelligence Composition: beta starting today

chocobitz825

Senior Member
lol in a funny turn of events, I stumbled onto an anime streaming on netflix here called Carole & Tuesday, set on a futuristic Mars. Two Young girls aim to be music stars in a world where 90% of music is made by AI, and the assumed "warmth" that can only be achieved by Humans is said to be easily reproduced by AI using a "heart warming parameter". I had to laugh as it brought me back to this conversation.
 
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Holden Sandman

Gear Junkie
Aiva has developed quite a bit since this thread started.

New presets (styles of music)

  1. Modern Cinematic
  2. 20th Century Cinematic
  3. Sea Shanties
  4. Jazz
  5. Fantasy
  6. Pop
  7. Rock
  8. Chinese
  9. Tango
  10. Electronic (coming soon)
Lots of different ensembles depending upon style, ranging from Piano to Epic Orchestra, Solo Strings to Lounge Jazz Band.

This month users are expecting the upload an influence feature to become available.

Aiva is a very interesting tool and it's getting better every week.
 

MartinH.

Senior Member
Universal basic income is inevitable because it will be infeasible to structure a society around the concept of "human labour" at some point in the next couple of decades. That seems to be the consensus among the programmers that I've talked with. Some even left the field of AI research entirely, for ethical concerns.
 

Tim_Wells

Tim Wells
Universal basic income is inevitable because it will be infeasible to structure a society around the concept of "human labour" at some point in the next couple of decades. That seems to be the consensus among the programmers that I've talked with. Some even left the field of AI research entirely, for ethical concerns.
I respect your opinion. And certainly there are people much smarter than I who agree with you.

But I personally believe that new types of jobs will fill the void taken by AI. This has always been the case with technological advancement in the past and I feel confident it will be the case again. The key is to be willing to change your approach as the technology changes.
 

Sibelius19

Music is just color and rhythm --Debussy
Universal basic income is inevitable because it will be infeasible to structure a society around the concept of "human labour" at some point in the next couple of decades. That seems to be the consensus among the programmers that I've talked with. Some even left the field of AI research entirely, for ethical concerns.
I think it will take a long time, but I agree with you. Fortunately (hopefully?) it will likely be a slow burn (of losing human centered jobs) and the adjustments can be made gradually. But I think we do need to consider the impact that technology has on our economic ecosystem.
In some ways, the collective "conscious" of a society cannot be controlled, so these changes are likely inevitable. The desire for increased efficiency and ease will always win out. I think all we can do is try to adapt the best we can. I think maybe a basic income is one possible way to help adapt. But then I wonder, if that happens, wouldn't it be like everyone is at zero if everyone was given the same basic income? Maybe it would be simpler if certain things were just made free. Then you wouldn't have to deal with the money aspect as well.
Then the question becomes, what has value?
This is a difficult topic to be honest... but I think perhaps not one for this particular thread haha
 

jonathanparham

Active Member
In the late 80s, I remember an electric jazz bass player complaining about his gig being replaced by a keyboard player's left-hand bass notes.

There's been multi-tracking, then midi, hardware sequencers, DAWs, samples. . . I responded on Youtube to some of this but I agree that it's not ready for prime time, but it's coming. I can see some producer with a bunch of rooms with this software on multiple stations.
 
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purple

Member
I respect your opinion. And certainly there are people much smarter than I who agree with you.

But I personally believe that new types of jobs will fill the void taken by AI. This has always been the case with technological advancement in the past and I feel confident it will be the case again. The key is to be willing to change your approach as the technology changes.
But will there be enough new jobs? Will those jobs be in the communities affected most by automation? Will those jobs be suitable for the people put out of work?

Will the millions of truck drivers, truck stop workers, and millions of people living in small highway towns that rely on those truck drivers for their local economy just move to silicon valley and become software engineers? This is not a distant reality, there are already self driving trucks on the road. For now they still have a driver inside making sure everything works, but as soon as they are confident they can run without a driver it will become the standard faster than you can say "unemployment"

What about millions of retail workers?
Millions of telemarketers?
Delivery workers?

Ironically, it is the traditionally "white collar" jobs that will go first. Accountants, HR, customer service, analysts, even some salespeople will see significant downsizing in their field as AI makes their jobs more efficient. Mechanics, electricians, plumbers, and other trades are a bit too mechanically complex at the moment for robots to handle not to mention the complicated problem solving needed.
 

Tim_Wells

Tim Wells
But will there be enough new jobs? Will those jobs be in the communities affected most by automation? Will those jobs be suitable for the people put out of work?

Will the millions of truck drivers, truck stop workers, and millions of people living in small highway towns that rely on those truck drivers for their local economy just move to silicon valley and become software engineers? This is not a distant reality, there are already self driving trucks on the road. For now they still have a driver inside making sure everything works, but as soon as they are confident they can run without a driver it will become the standard faster than you can say "unemployment"

What about millions of retail workers?
Millions of telemarketers?
Delivery workers?

Ironically, it is the traditionally "white collar" jobs that will go first. Accountants, HR, customer service, analysts, even some salespeople will see significant downsizing in their field as AI makes their jobs more efficient. Mechanics, electricians, plumbers, and other trades are a bit too mechanically complex at the moment for robots to handle not to mention the complicated problem solving needed.
I agree with much of what you're saying. The jobs will change and a lot of people will not be prepared. I still say there will be plenty of jobs, if you have the proper skill set. So what we have is skills and training problem and not a "jobs" problem.

It's no different than what's been happening for the last 40 years. Some believed that they should be able to walk out with their high-school diploma and get a great job at a factory and have comfortable middle class life. But that has obviously changed.

Since I'm a retired CPA, I'll speak to the Accountant example you sighted. Any high level Accountant is constantly making difficult judgement calls about a myriad of complex issues (both tangible and intangible). Despite what people think about accounting, there is often no one right answer to a problem. We are a century or more away from any machine being able to replace a smart, experienced Accountant. Maybe a bookkeeper who does the exact same thing all the time. But those are becoming less common anyway.

Now AI will be able to help a CPA with the complex decision making. That will be a great boon to productivity.

But I get your very good point about the disruption that AI will play in industries and communities. It will be devastating to some. I just think people need to start getting prepared.... rather than trying to "bring back the coal mining jobs". ;)
 
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