Adam a5x or a7x (or any other option)

wst3

my office these days
Moderator
At the risk of sounding like a geek, or audio fanatic, or whatever...

Room treatment, and system equalization are inextricably linked, and there are a number of methods floating around the world wide web.

Smarter people than I have pretty much codified the process, which is to say they have come up with a process that works about as well as one can expect. It is not perfect, but it is a lot better than most.

There are three steps, and with each one the effectiveness does decrease. You will need three equalizers, one for each step, and it is much easier if you have a DSP capable of creating FIR filters.

Step One: Equalize the direct field - this is the one, and ONLY, step where one can make a noticeable improvement every time. As it turns out, a lot of manufacturers are now providing filter coefficients for their products, unfortunately, monitor loudspeaker manufacturers have not caught up, which is not entirely unexpected, we are a niche market, and the process is complex and expensive.

The idea is simple enough - you capture the impulse response of the loudspeaker without room influences, and create a filter that is the inverse, which corrects any frequency response anomalies in the loudspeaker monitor itself. The nice thing is this is, for all intents, a one time thing.

Active loudspeaker monitors often ship with this filter stage implemented at the factory.

Step Two: with a known response for the direct field of the loudspeaker you can now create a second filter to correct for room placement problems. Actually, you can use a filter, or you can use room treatments. If you use a filter the "sweet spot" will probably be smaller, but unless you room is really bad, or you tend to dance all over the place while tracking or mixing, it works pretty well.

This is the correction applied by some of the software "room correction" processes. It can make a difference, a positive difference, but it depends on an accurate response from step 1.

If anyone tells you that they can correct both the direct and reflected or reverberant fields with a single measurement or single step you should be wary.

If you can do step 1 then a combination of room treatment and equalization can be really effective. I tend to favor room treatment, but I'm an old fart.

Step Three: correcting for the room itself. Can't be done. Which doesn't mean you shouldn't try, it means you need to understand what you are trying to fix.

The idea, and it has become somewhat accepted, is that if you have a room mode at 100 Hz then you can mitigate the effect by introducing less energy at 100 Hz, and therefore avoid exciting the room mode. So far so good. What you need to keep in mind is that the mode exists, you can't get of it with an equalizer. You can only eliminate it by changing the room geometry, or size, or both.

You can reduce the impact of room modes by placing your monitor loudspeakers, and ears, carefully, so that the do not fall on a peak or null in the standing wave. This idea was once considered heresy, but it turns out it helps a lot. It doesn't solve the problem, but it reduces the negative effect.

You can also reduce the effect with bass traps and diffusers. But you can create as many problems with tuned traps as you might solve. Broadband traps are less risky, but I've been in rooms that were worse from over use of traps.

Ultimately the best listening environment is the result of judicious use of absorption, reflection, diffusion, traps, and equalizers - along with well behaved monitor loudspeakers, and good (if not optimal) placement of monitors and ears.

Apologies for the long winded answer, but choosing, and using monitor loudspeakers in a critical listening space is a complex, and somewhat mis-reported topic.

And it we are lucky Nick will be along shortly to explain why we all worry far more than we need to about reflections, and especially early reflections. He makes that argument better than I (and my fingers are getting tired).

Lastly - most of the monitor loudspeakers mentioned thus far are capable of delivering excellent performance. There a couple models that I don't care for - but that has more to do with my ears, and my musical tastes than anything else.

Good luck, and don't get too caught up in this, and do listen to the Presonus Sceptres (sorry, couldn't resist!)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dex
Following this thread. I also need a set of monitors, and have been eyeing the Adam A7X for some time. They seem quite ubiquitous these days.
 

KEM

Active Member
I see nothing but love on the Amphion monitors, I plan on getting a pair eventually.
 
OP
ThomasNL

ThomasNL

Thomas van der Burg
Just for the people that are interested. I went with a pair of EVE audio SC205 in combination with a TS107 subwoofer. I'm loving the detailed highs of the SC205 but it's not that sharp as i found the adam a5x to be. The subwoofer perfectly covers the lows and it even comes with a remote control so i can control levels of the whole system.

I still want to put the speakers on stands but haven't really decided on that yet.
 
Just for the people that are interested. I went with a pair of EVE audio SC205 in combination with a TS107 subwoofer. I'm loving the detailed highs of the SC205 but it's not that sharp as i found the adam a5x to be. The subwoofer perfectly covers the lows and it even comes with a remote control so i can control levels of the whole system.

I still want to put the speakers on stands but haven't really decided on that yet.
Congrats!! Where did you get your Eve monitors? There aren’t a lot of resellers compared to other brands. I want to listen to them first but in the US it seems like only Sam Ash has them.
 

2chris

Member
Congrats on the monitors!

Did you upgrade from the Presonus Eris monitors or the R65? Because I love the R65.

I REALLY wanted the Adam A7X. I demoed them at a store that had the Adam A7X, Yamaha HS8, KRK RP8, Focal Alpha 65, JBL, and the Presonus R65 (Ribbon Tweater). I went in sure that I was going Adam, Focal, or Yamaha. BUT I kept going between the Adam and Presonus R65 (others were great - those just stuck out to me). Does the presonus R65 sound as good in the same treated room as the Adam monitors did? No! It doesn't, and I would NEVER claim that. But I quite like them, and for the same price I also got a Korg Minilogue XD, Sennheiser headphones, and accoustic treatment for my room. Do I regret it? NO. But one day... they will be mine.
 
OP
ThomasNL

ThomasNL

Thomas van der Burg
Congrats!! Where did you get your Eve monitors? There aren’t a lot of resellers compared to other brands. I want to listen to them first but in the US it seems like only Sam Ash has them.
I got lucky, there was a b-stock version (opened box) available at a local store and got a b-stock version of the subwoofer at Thomann.

Saved me around 3-400 euro's.
 

sluggo

Active Member
If you are near a pro-retailer who is willing, you can have them bring 2 (maybe 3) pairs of different monitors to your studios and do your own shootout with your own mixes. YOUR ears should decide. Everyone hears differently. (If you don't believe me ask Yanny and Laurel.)