8dio 66 Tubas?

jamwerks

Senior Member
part of the idea is transposing them an octave to get massive horns in case one has not checked the vids...Seeing if anyone has had experience with this library.
Yeah the transposed patch sounded very cool.
Better results in what regard?
I mean a mixture of non identical timbres sounds more "musical" (imo), more complex as in "ear candy", that might prove more usable.
 
OP
Craig Sharmat

Craig Sharmat

Moderator
Moderator
After watching the videos, I got the impression that having that many of an identical timbre isn't necessarily interesting. Maybe something like Majestica (with mixed groups) would give better results?
First thanks for taking the time to check out the video...:)
I get a fairly nice result layering a synth patch under low brass so that may be enough. Transposing majestic I think is limiting because the all the brass is mixed on one patch so the tone will not be the same?...I have their Black edition and I think Majestica is from that.
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
Yeah the transposed patch sounded very cool.
I mean a mixture of non identical timbres sounds more "musical" (imo), more complex as in "ear candy", that might prove more usable.
Probably depends on what you're trying to accomplish, yes?

I would pick up 66 tubas for sound design, while using Majestica for a more traditional approach.

Btw, I actually do have Majestica, which is why I was trying to get a better understanding of your comment. Thanks for the explanation.
 

jamwerks

Senior Member
Probably depends on what you're trying to accomplish, yes?
Definitely! I passed on the 66 Tubas, Double basses, Majectica (& HZS) for the reasoning I outlined above. In the Century Brass videos, they play an excerpt combining the Horns a12, a6, a2 & solo patches, and that sounds more "interesting" and "useful to me. Then if you have two or three voices, to one you add the 3 Trps patch, and the other the 3 Bones, having modular groups to design the mega sound.

Again, 66 Tubas lacked that complexity that I like, but might also be exactly what someone else likes...
 

Chr!s

Active Member
I just don't know why anyone would want an ensemble of 66 tubas.

Why don't they make "110 Kazoos" while they're at it?
 

Mike Fox

Senior Member
I just don't know why anyone would want an ensemble of 66 tubas.

Why don't they make "110 Kazoos" while they're at it?
I can't speak for the tubas, but I would love to have the 66 basses for the sound design aspect of it.
 

NoamL

Winter <3
There is a reason to have experimental ensembles like this, HZS, etc. It's fun to use a sound that (almost) nobody else ever has created music with.

And there's also a reason to have traditional instruments. Classical composers and classic film composers did not need 66 brass instruments, or even 20, to create their epic scores. They did not need even 70 strings, much less 320.

Just listen to any "A Cast Of Thousands!!" biblical film score from the fifties by Rózsa or Alfred Newman. They matched images just as epic as any Nolan or Snyder film, using a studio orchestra.


Tuba, 4 tbn, 6 hn, 5 trumpets (one is a first chair assistant I believe).

I'm not convinced you can get much "bigger" than this!!

In a way, what HZ did on Inception was not really go 10x as large as an orchestra, but more of a re-orchestration or re-imagining of the brass. If you kick out the trumpets, how do you still get that "thump you in the chest" brass sound? It's not with 20 horns. They will never create that sound, especially in the baritone register.


It's with 4 tubas (looks like one doubling cimbassi!), 6 bass tbn, 6 tenor tbn, 6 hn. It's a large ensemble but the right proportions are still there. Similar to a score by Bernard Hermann called Cape Fear which also had no trumpets. That score has larger proportions but also more independence of parts. For a score like Inception, the way it was scored really feels like an upper limit.

That could be HZ's defining characteristic as a composer. He exactly knows where the line is - that's how he's able to dance on it so successfully. Then people try to "beat" him and they show why the line was there ;)
 
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Consona

Senior Member
These libraries are useful in the "over-produced" pieces, by that I mean, you don't care about sections balance or anything, you just mix the orchestra and all the other sounds like it was a rock band. Even these 12 horns patches from Cinesamples or Audio Imperia sound way too big to use in a "normal" production.

The other day I was orchestrating a rather big sounding LotR/Hobbit-alike action piece and all I needed for a nice low brass bite was one... yes, one... cimbasso (well, it's doubled with bass trombone in Cinebrass, but the bite came primarily from the cimbasso (tuba + bass trombone doubling is nowhere near as biting)). So ok, not one, but two instruments, but you get my point.

These uber-sections are basically for some "sound-designy" pieces, otherwise it all sounds so out of place, the nature of that huge sound (even those 12 piece sections) is just way too overwhelming for normal scoring. There's a good reason all those sections in classical music have the number of players they have (more people wouldn't fit into the room, you know :laugh:). It's hundreds of years of refinement.

But if you wanna be the one scoring the Aquaman 2 trailer then for sure, go ahead and buy 66 tubas, that's the name of the game right now.

I remember Hans Zimmer in the debate about his Spitfire Strings saying, I paraphrase, that there's no need to try to emulate the sound of a normal orchestra these days. Like it was quite passé or something. Yet I go and listen to Horner's Star Trek pieces played by Cincinnati Pops and there you have it, zero mixing and it sounds fabulous...


My god that's so good. :emoji_heart_eyes_cat: :grin: And it's not even some lush reverby romantic recording, it's rather dry... yet delicious. No 66 tubas and 340 string players though. :P
 
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Henu

Senior Member
You cannot get any more epic than Rózsa, no matter how many tubas you have. Man, I love this stuff.
 

NoamL

Winter <3
But if you wanna be the one scoring the Aquaman 2 trailer then for sure, go ahead and buy 66 tubas, that's the name of the game right now.
Well, the Aquaman 1 trailer used this. (this is just the orchestra stem)


The low end is actually really clear :thumbsup:

The real power in this piece comes from that crazy horn + trombone unison doubling!

I have Trailer Brass and it has an amazing patch called "The Horde" which sounds like 10 low brass players all together. But on the tracks I've written so far, I save it for literally the last cycle of the theme during the Act 3 trailer climax. The equivalent of 1:48 in this track. If it's used in any way before that point, there's simply nowhere "up" left to go.
 

Consona

Senior Member
The only funny comment was "110 Kazoos".

Noone is saying these libraries should not exist, people should not use them, and such.