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5 MBytes = 0.000005 TBytes

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Tatiana Gordeeva

Tatiana Gordeeva

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utter amazing!!!
Indeed. :cool: And now with MAMR (microwave-assisted magnetic recording) technology they promise us 40TB+ HDDs next year. Can't wait to replace my RAID 6 array with 2 disks in RAID 1 giving me the same capacity. :geek: Now give me that in a NVMe PCIe 5 format and I'll be a very happy camper! :)
 
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Tatiana Gordeeva

Tatiana Gordeeva

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I remember working one of those. Also paper tape storage. That was a trip!
Yup, he said to me that when he worked in a nuclear physics lab they had results shooting out of some device on paper punched tape in some "epsidick" (??) format like a piano roll. After a while he was able to read it with his fingers to find a particular data, like Braille!
 

MartinH.

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Indeed. :cool: And now with MAMR (microwave-assisted magnetic recording) technology they promise us 40TB+ HDDs next year.

I recently found out the disk usage indicator of the windows explorer has a color other than red. I'm so used to it always being in the red because I produce so much data. 40TB drives would be awesome, but I'm not an early adopter for new tech, I'd want to see some real world data about their lifetime first.
 

TigerTheFrog

Reid Rosefelt
I traveled the world with my Compaq lugtop. Laptops were way out of my budget in those days. They were over $3000 and $3000 was worth a lot more back then.

No hard disk. One 5.25 floppy loaded Sequencer Plus and I stored my music files in another 5.25 floppy. Each one had a mammoth 360K. You don't know how thrilling it was when the 3.5 disks came out. 1.44 MB! And the hard outer shell on the 3.5 disks made them less susceptible to fingerprints.

Sequencer Plus, which ran in DOS, didn't generate any musical sounds by itself. You plugged in a MIDI card and then it ran your synths and modules. (You could also use a SoundBlaster card) I remember very well when the Roland MIDI cards came out and I rushed uptown to buy one at Manny's.

When I showed up at one movie location with this heavy thing, the production office referred to it as my sewing machine.

compaq.jpg

Sequencer Plus, which didn't have the baggage of visual files, ran lightning fast, and is still one of the very best pieces of music-making software I've ever owned.

 
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dzilizzi

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My first computer, which my dad and I built, had 2, yes 2!, 20 MB drives plus a 5.25 floppy drive. It was amazing. And it got me through college with an illegally cloned copy of Lotus Symphony. Which, though it sounds musical, was a MS Office precursor. My dad was smart in that he taught me to put all programs on one drive, back it up once. Then documents on the other drive, making it easy to back up just your documents.

He had also given me the family's Trash-80 when I first moved out. But it didn't have hard drives, just a floppy, and I didn't have the programs I needed to do my accounting classes.
 
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Tatiana Gordeeva

Tatiana Gordeeva

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One 5.25 floppy loaded Sequencer Plus and I stored my music files in another 5.25 floppy. Each one had a mammoth 360K.
360K!! :geek: You were sooo lucky! You did not have to suffer with 180K or, :eek:, the cassette interface of the original PC!! My husband did and he also used Sequencer Plus w. card, Personal Composer AND the (infamous) MPU-401!!! Now STOP people! I beg you! The fact that I can even understand what you're talking about makes me feel sooo sad... :crying:

Seriously, I'm not that old, my husband is :sneaky: He's a tech dinosaur sharing his horror stories with me. Actually, he's not even old himself, just a very early adopter. He was very young in those days. And of course, I was not even born :rolleyes:
 

Polkasound

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My journey with computers in music started in the early 1990s. I was living at home yet where we had one family PC in an office on the first floor. In order to use the PC in my studio in the basement, I had to buy a second monitor, keyboard, and mouse, and run a set of long extension cables down through the floor.

My sequencer was Cakewalk 2.0. I would stripe a time code to a track on my Tascam 38 reel-to-reel and trigger sounds in my Roland sound modules.

Today, the micro SD card in my phone holds 6,400 times more data than that first PC.
 
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