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100% Cinesamples composition - Searching for the Light

willbedford

Composer - Sample Library Developer
Hi all,
This is the first composition I've posted here - a hybrid/fusion demo written for Cinesamples, featuring only their libraries.

Here are the libraries I used:
Cineperc Complete
Descant Horn
Dulcimer and Zither
African Marimba & Udu (new library released this week)
Cinestrings CORE
Cinebrass CORE
Cinewinds Core & Pro
Jerry's Pianos
Tina Guo
Piano in Blue
Cineharp
Cinestrings SOLO


Enjoy!
 
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ghandizilla

and .then()
It's perfectly balanced. Love it! (Didn't know you could blend an african marimba this well in an orchestration :) )
 
OP
willbedford

willbedford

Composer - Sample Library Developer
Thread starter
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It's perfectly balanced. Love it! (Didn't know you could blend an african marimba this well in an orchestration :) )
Thanks! It's recorded in the same hall as their other libraries, so it's pretty easy to blend.
 
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chrysshawk

Active Member
Very nice! Pretty dry and in your face with the signature Sony sound - just what Cinesamples seeks to deliver. Is this a birthday present for Mike Patti? ;)
On the tech side: Did you use any additional reverb for the orchestral sections?
 

Rodney Money

On V.I. avoiding work.
Hi all,
This is the first composition I've posted here - a hybrid/fusion demo written for Cinesamples, featuring only their libraries.

Here are the libraries I used:
Cineperc Complete
Dulcimer and Zither
African Marimba & Udu (new library released this week)
Cinestrings CORE
Cinebrass CORE
Cinewinds Core & Pro
Jerry's Pianos
Tina Guo
Piano in Blue
Cineharp
Cinestrings SOLO
(and one not-yet-released library)

Enjoy!
Alright my friend, take my comments as either a grain of salt or an avalanche of powered snow. I enjoyed many aspects of your track especially the lighter percussive moments, the ethnic timbres, the new African Marimba and the Udu (did you have to eq the bass out of that sucker? Lol, jk,) but overall I was more impressed with your production skills than the overall composition itself. There is nothing wrong with your piece, it just sounds like you did the typical: write a chord progression, without going to the piano I think my ears are telling me am, G, dm maybe, write a horn melody over top of the accompaniment, add some softer vamping bridges that crescendo to the next louder part with an added epic percussion groove. We've heard this many, many times before, my friend. I simply think you could have put more time in the overall composition itself starting with more moving, articulated rhythmic parts in the melody but still keeping it beautiful instead of the common "arpeggiated whole-note horn melody that outlines the chords a little too much." The horn melody at the beginning has way too much edge in the sound that is grating to the ears, and I see what your are trying to do with the added Celtic Penny Whistle on top the second time, but it does not quite work creating too much of yen-yang. What horn patch are you using at the beginning? Solo Horn from Pro or another more epic patch? I would advice if you had to go with horn, keep that brassy edge off, keep it warm such as horn a2 in Core for example. But I would honestly not use horn at the beginning. We have heard it all before, and when you bring it back in the epic end it does absolutely nothing to make the piece sound bigger. I think you should start the piece with the penny whistle instead and just let it sing or the Uilleann Pipes or Border Pipes. You have this folky sound, timbre, going on, and then we hear not another folky instrument but horn. I know you are going for the noble, so keep the edge off the horn or totally change the solo instrument to something with a little more "personality" or character like the CineWind Pro Ethnic Winds, CineString Soloists, or something like Alto Flute.

I would almost cut out from 1:00 to 1:10 since the strings do absolutely nothing more than sound like a background chordal progression and your emotion is being driven mainly by your percussion, not the strings. In that part I would have loved if the violins sang out the melody a little more in the homophonic texture so it did not sound simply as your chord progression with strings at forte with added percussion. I think a greater impact would've been if you did a huge, gradual buildup connecting :47 and 1:14 then letting out the full epic with the horn melody adding trumpets as an answer (you see, in African music you have call and responses, and the echo of call and response from horn to trumpets would have been pure genius, because it then tells of the culture and history of the African people since you introduced us to the Africa Marimba.) Little things like that is what sets composition and composers apart. Williams spends more time over his melodies than the actual composition itself. Instead of worrying about "write quickly, get the track out," take your time with the melody, how could you improved it, or did you just improvise over the top of the chord progression once you written out the accompaniment? And think what little subtleties could I use to make my piece seem a "little deeper." Overall though, great job. I just personally think with more time and more work, you can turn this piece into something greater with more substance.
 

Paul T McGraw

Senior Member
Alright my friend, take my comments as either a grain of salt or an avalanche of powered snow. I enjoyed many aspects of your track especially the lighter percussive moments, the ethnic timbres, the new African Marimba and the Udu (did you have to eq the bass out of that sucker? Lol, jk,) but overall I was more impressed with your production skills than the overall composition itself. There is nothing wrong with your piece, it just sounds like you did the typical: write a chord progression, without going to the piano I think my ears are telling me am, G, dm maybe, write a horn melody over top of the accompaniment, add some softer vamping bridges that crescendo to the next louder part with an added epic percussion groove. We've heard this many, many times before, my friend. I simply think you could have put more time in the overall composition itself starting with more moving, articulated rhythmic parts in the melody but still keeping it beautiful instead of the common "arpeggiated whole-note horn melody that outlines the chords a little too much." The horn melody at the beginning has way too much edge in the sound that is grating to the ears, and I see what your are trying to do with the added Celtic Penny Whistle on top the second time, but it does not quite work creating too much of yen-yang. What horn patch are you using at the beginning? Solo Horn from Pro or another more epic patch? I would advice if you had to go with horn, keep that brassy edge off, keep it warm such as horn a2 in Core for example. But I would honestly not use horn at the beginning. We have heard it all before, and when you bring it back in the epic end it does absolutely nothing to make the piece sound bigger. I think you should start the piece with the penny whistle instead and just let it sing or the Uilleann Pipes or Border Pipes. You have this folky sound, timbre, going on, and then we hear not another folky instrument but horn. I know you are going for the noble, so keep the edge off the horn or totally change the solo instrument to something with a little more "personality" or character like the CineWind Pro Ethnic Winds, CineString Soloists, or something like Alto Flute.

I would almost cut out from 1:00 to 1:10 since the strings do absolutely nothing more than sound like a background chordal progression and your emotion is being driven mainly by your percussion, not the strings. In that part I would have loved if the violins sang out the melody a little more in the homophonic texture so it did not sound simply as your chord progression with strings at forte with added percussion. I think a greater impact would've been if you did a huge, gradual buildup connecting :47 and 1:14 then letting out the full epic with the horn melody adding trumpets as an answer (you see, in African music you have call and responses, and the echo of call and response from horn to trumpets would have been pure genius, because it then tells of the culture and history of the African people since you introduced us to the Africa Marimba.) Little things like that is what sets composition and composers apart. Williams spends more time over his melodies than the actual composition itself. Instead of worrying about "write quickly, get the track out," take your time with the melody, how could you improved it, or did you just improvise over the top of the chord progression once you written out the accompaniment? And think what little subtleties could I use to make my piece seem a "little deeper." Overall though, great job. I just personally think with more time and more work, you can turn this piece into something greater with more substance.

Wow Rodney, you really put a lot of thought and time into this feedback. And putting my mental ear to work I can "hear" that your ideas would have made this a much better composition. The track has a great sound, but it would have been an even stronger composition with your suggestions. You should teach composition. For a fee of course. Or perhaps just give detailed feedback and ideas for a fee. Not many people will put this much time into trying to help another composer gratis. God bless you for the effort.
 

Niel

Member
Nice job, very good balanced and mixed!

Thanks for the comments guys! Thanks @Rodney Money - lots to take in there.

Would people find a video overview of my session helpful? I could throw one together next week. That would be easier than trying to explain my production choices here.

Yes, it would be great.
 

desert

Just here so I don't get fined
Alright my friend, take my comments as either a grain of salt or an avalanche of powered snow. I enjoyed many aspects of your track especially the lighter percussive moments, the ethnic timbres, the new African Marimba and the Udu (did you have to eq the bass out of that sucker? Lol, jk,) but overall I was more impressed with your production skills than the overall composition itself. There is nothing wrong with your piece, it just sounds like you did the typical: write a chord progression, without going to the piano I think my ears are telling me am, G, dm maybe, write a horn melody over top of the accompaniment, add some softer vamping bridges that crescendo to the next louder part with an added epic percussion groove. We've heard this many, many times before, my friend. I simply think you could have put more time in the overall composition itself starting with more moving, articulated rhythmic parts in the melody but still keeping it beautiful instead of the common "arpeggiated whole-note horn melody that outlines the chords a little too much." The horn melody at the beginning has way too much edge in the sound that is grating to the ears, and I see what your are trying to do with the added Celtic Penny Whistle on top the second time, but it does not quite work creating too much of yen-yang. What horn patch are you using at the beginning? Solo Horn from Pro or another more epic patch? I would advice if you had to go with horn, keep that brassy edge off, keep it warm such as horn a2 in Core for example. But I would honestly not use horn at the beginning. We have heard it all before, and when you bring it back in the epic end it does absolutely nothing to make the piece sound bigger. I think you should start the piece with the penny whistle instead and just let it sing or the Uilleann Pipes or Border Pipes. You have this folky sound, timbre, going on, and then we hear not another folky instrument but horn. I know you are going for the noble, so keep the edge off the horn or totally change the solo instrument to something with a little more "personality" or character like the CineWind Pro Ethnic Winds, CineString Soloists, or something like Alto Flute.

I would almost cut out from 1:00 to 1:10 since the strings do absolutely nothing more than sound like a background chordal progression and your emotion is being driven mainly by your percussion, not the strings. In that part I would have loved if the violins sang out the melody a little more in the homophonic texture so it did not sound simply as your chord progression with strings at forte with added percussion. I think a greater impact would've been if you did a huge, gradual buildup connecting :47 and 1:14 then letting out the full epic with the horn melody adding trumpets as an answer (you see, in African music you have call and responses, and the echo of call and response from horn to trumpets would have been pure genius, because it then tells of the culture and history of the African people since you introduced us to the Africa Marimba.) Little things like that is what sets composition and composers apart. Williams spends more time over his melodies than the actual composition itself. Instead of worrying about "write quickly, get the track out," take your time with the melody, how could you improved it, or did you just improvise over the top of the chord progression once you written out the accompaniment? And think what little subtleties could I use to make my piece seem a "little deeper." Overall though, great job. I just personally think with more time and more work, you can turn this piece into something greater with more substance.

Definitely agree with what Rodney said. I really think when you bring back the melody at 1:27 one of the chords has to change (maybe C Maj to the gm) to create more epicness for the finale. Horn should be 'saved up' for this part like Rodney said. Andd... take my comments as more grains of salt.

BUT THAT PRODUCTION WORK :D :D fantastic!! Looking forward to the video
 
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